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can anyone please explain how this works (asz + 7) & ~7; It rounds off asz to the next higher multiple of 8.

It is easy to see that ~7 produces 11111000 (8bit representation) and hence switches off the last 3 bits ,thus any number which is produced is a multiple of 8.

My question is how does adding asz to 7 before masking [edit] produce the next higher[end edit] multiple of 8 ? I tried writing it down on paper

like :

1 + 7 = 8  = 1|000 (& ~7) -> 1000
2 + 7 = 9  = 1|001 (& ~7) -> 1000
3 + 7 = 10 = 1|010 (& ~7) -> 1000
4 + 7 = 11 = 1|011 (& ~7) -> 1000
5 + 7 = 12 = 1|100 (& ~7) -> 1000
6 + 7 = 13 = 1|101 (& ~7) -> 1000
7 + 7 = 14 = 1|110 (& ~7) -> 1000
8 + 7 = 15 = 1|111 (& ~7) -> 1000

A pattern clearly seems to emerge which has been exploited .Can anyone please help me it out ?

Thank You all for the answers.It helped confirm what I was thinking. I continued the writing the pattern above and when I crossed 10 , i could clearly see that the nos are promoted to the next "block of 8" if I can say so.

Thanks again.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Well, if you were trying to round down, you wouldn't need the addition. Just doing the masking step would clear out the bottom bits and you'd get rounded to the next lower multiple.

If you want to round up, first you have to add enough to "get past" the next multiple of 8. Then the same masking step takes you back down to the multiple of 8. The reason you choose 7 is that it's the only number guaranteed to be "big enough" to get you from any number up past the next multiple of 8 without going up an extra multiple if your original number were already a multiple of 8.

In general, to round up to a power of two:

unsigned int roundTo(unsigned int value, unsigned int roundTo)
{
    return (value + (roundTo - 1)) & ~(roundTo - 1);
}
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rounding an integer n down to any integer m can be achieved with (n/m)*m –  Greg Rogers Nov 19 '09 at 21:16
    
The & ~ bit only works if the roundTo is a power of 2. In general you need return ( (value + roundTo - 1) / roundTo )* roundTo; instead. –  Michael Anderson May 19 '12 at 8:53
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It's actually adding 7 to the number and rounding down.

This has the desired effect of rounding up to the next multiple of 8. (Adding +8 instead of +7 would bump a value of 8 to 16.)

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Incidentally this trick won't work if the number you want to round to a multiple of is not a multiple of the base of the number. Short version: You can't add 8 and round to 9, but you can add 15 and round to 16. –  Broam Nov 20 '09 at 13:25
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The +7 isn't to produce an exact multiple of 8, it's to make sure you get the next highest multiple of eight.

edit: Beaten by 16 seconds and several orders of quality. Oh well, back to lurking.

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Well, the mask would produce an exact multiple of 8 by itself. Adding 7 to asz ensures that you get the next higher multiple.

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Without the +7 it will be the biggest multiple of 8 less or equal to your orig number

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Adding 7 does not produce a multiple of 8. The multiple of 8 is produced by anding with ~7. ~7 is the complement of 7, which is 0xffff fff8 (except using however many bits are in an int). This truncates, or rounds down.

Adding 7 before doing that insures that no value lower than asz is returned. You've already worked out how that works.

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Uhh, you just answered your own question??? by adding 7, you are guaranteeing the result will be at or above the next multiple of 8. truncating then gives you that multiple.

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