Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following is inside GNU m4 sources in a file called lib/verror.h :

/* Declaration for va_list error-reporting function
   Copyright (C) 2006-2007, 2009-2011 Free Software Foundation, Inc.

   This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
   it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
   the Free Software Foundation; either version 3 of the License, or
   (at your option) any later version.

   This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
   but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
   MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
   GNU General Public License for more details.

   You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
   along with this program.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.  */

#ifndef _VERROR_H
#define _VERROR_H 1

#include "error.h"
#include <stdarg.h>

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

/* Print a message with `vfprintf (stderr, FORMAT, ARGS)';
   if ERRNUM is nonzero, follow it with ": " and strerror (ERRNUM).
   If STATUS is nonzero, terminate the program with `exit (STATUS)'.
   Use the globals error_print_progname and error_message_count similarly
   to error().  */

extern void verror (int __status, int __errnum, const char *__format,
                    va_list __args)
     __attribute__ ((__format__ (__printf__, 3, 0)));

/* Print a message with `vfprintf (stderr, FORMAT, ARGS)';
   if ERRNUM is nonzero, follow it with ": " and strerror (ERRNUM).
   If STATUS is nonzero, terminate the program with `exit (STATUS)'.
   If FNAME is not NULL, prepend the message with `FNAME:LINENO:'.
   Use the globals error_print_progname, error_message_count, and
   error_one_per_line similarly to error_at_line().  */

extern void verror_at_line (int __status, int __errnum, const char *__fname,
                            unsigned int __lineno, const char *__format,
                            va_list __args)
     __attribute__ ((__format__ (__printf__, 5, 0)));

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

#endif /* verror.h */

My compiler blows up all over that strange thing called "attribute" and I looked in the K&R C for it but can not find it.

Looks to be a strictly GNUism GCC thing and not C at all.

So the question is how to remove this junk to make the code able to be compiled by an old C compiler on an old Sun server? The very same compiler can build GNU make just fine as well as libiconv and gNU gettext but the latest GNU m4 looks to be non-portable.

The error that I see is :

/opt/SUNWspro/bin/cc  -I.   -D_REENTRANT -I/usr/local/include  -dy -xmemalign=8s -errfmt=error -erroff=%none -errshort=full -errwarn=%none -fns=no -ftrap=%none -xarch=v9 -xcode=pic32 -g -i -mc -Qy -v -Wl,-R/usr/local/lib -Xa -xstrconst -xtemp=/var/tmp -xunroll=1 -D_POSIX_PTHREAD_SEMANTICS -D_LARGEFILE64_SOURCE -D_TS_ERRNO -c verror.c
"verror.h", line 35: error: syntax error before or at: __attribute__
"verror.h", line 35: warning: old-style declaration or incorrect type for: __attribute__
"verror.h", line 35: warning: syntax error:  empty declaration
"verror.h", line 47: error: syntax error before or at: __attribute__
"verror.h", line 47: warning: old-style declaration or incorrect type for: __attribute__
"verror.h", line 47: error: identifier redefined: __attribute__
        current : function() returning int
        previous: function() returning int : "verror.h", line 35
"verror.h", line 47: warning: syntax error:  empty declaration
"verror.c", line 44: error: identifier redefined: verror
        current : function(int, int, pointer to const char, pointer to void) returning void
        previous: function(int, int, pointer to const char, pointer to void) returning void : "verror.h", line 33
"verror.c", line 57: error: identifier redefined: verror_at_line
        current : function(int, int, pointer to const char, unsigned int, pointer to const char, pointer to void) returning void
        previous: function(int, int, pointer to const char, unsigned int, pointer to const char, pointer to void) returning void : "verror.h", line 44
cc: acomp failed for verror.c
gmake[3]: *** [verror.o] Error 2
gmake[3]: Leaving directory `/usr/local/build/m4-1.4.16_SunOS5.8_sparcv9.001/lib'
gmake[2]: *** [all] Error 2
gmake[2]: Leaving directory `/usr/local/build/m4-1.4.16_SunOS5.8_sparcv9.001/lib'
gmake[1]: *** [all-recursive] Error 1
gmake[1]: Leaving directory `/usr/local/build/m4-1.4.16_SunOS5.8_sparcv9.001'
gmake: *** [all] Error 2

pretty nasty looking stuff that.

share|improve this question
    
Put this in some header file and include it: #define __attribute__(x) /* as nothing */. The __attribute__ syntax is designed to make this possible (double-parens). Alternatively, download GCC for Solaris and use that, since GNU contributors generally feel free to use GCC extensions. –  Nemo Jul 15 '13 at 23:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

__attribute__ is a GCC extension, which has also been borrowed by clang and maybe other compilers as well. If your compiler doesn't support attributes using this syntax, you can get rid of the errors by defining this macro before any attributes are used:

#define __attribute__(x)

Keep in mind though that removing attributes may affect the program's behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
So essentially a non-portable piece of code thrown in by the GNU/Linux world to render GNU m4 non-portable. Lovely. OKay, I will give this a try but first I will look at an older release of GNU m4 to see if it has the same issue. If not then I will use an older GNU m4 until I can bootstrap GCC. Actually, m4-1.4.14 compiles just fine. Looks like a recent addition in GNU m4 breaks it for portability. I should file a bug, which will get ignored. –  paul lanken Jul 15 '13 at 23:59
1  
@paullanken: In this particular case, disabling the attribute won't do anything at all in terms of program behaviour, but it should allow it to compile. That particular attribute looks like it tells the compiler that it expects a "printf"-style format string (which in turn allows for better diagnostics when invalid format specifiers are given etc). Log a bug though... the source code now "assumes" GCC (or clang) is the compiler, which isn't great for portability as you say. –  dreamlax Jul 16 '13 at 0:01
    
@paullanken: Note that USUALLY, the configure script will create precisely this macro for you when you configure the package to build with a non-gcc compiler. The fact that it didn't suggests you didn't run configure properly. Check the INSTALL instructions for your m4 package that you're trying to build... –  Chris Dodd Jul 16 '13 at 0:05
    
configure line looks good : ./configure --enable-dependency-tracking --enable-threads=posix --with-libsigsegv-prefix=/usr/local so that isn't the issue. I have reverted down to m4 (GNU M4) 1.4.14 which compiles and tests fine. I want to see if I can find where the GCCism feature was inserted and file a bug report with some valid info in it. –  paul lanken Jul 16 '13 at 0:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.