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I want to return unique items based on condition, sorted by price asc. My query fails because Postgres wants items.id to be present in the group by clause. If it's included the query returns everything matching the where clause, which is not what I want. Why do I need to include the column?

select items.*
from items
where product_id = 1 and items.status = 'in_stock'
group by condition /* , items.id returns everything */
order by items.price asc

| id | condition | price |
--------------------------
| 1 | new        | 9     |
| 2 | good       | 5     |
| 3 | good       | 3     |

I only want items with ids 1 and 3.

Update: Here's a fiddle using the answer below, which still produces the error:

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!1/33786/2

share|improve this question
    
You still get the error because you're trying to ORDER BY an un-aggregated column price. You can only ORDER BY the query results. – Craig Ringer Jul 16 '13 at 1:13

SQL Fiddle

select *
from (
    select distinct on (cond)
        id, cond, price
    from items
    where product_id = 1 and items.status = 'in_stock'
    order by cond, price
) s
order by price
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Could you contrast your answer with that of ruakh? Any reason to use the sub select as opposed to aggregate functions? – dee Jul 16 '13 at 0:34
    
@dee I think ruakh's answer is wrong as it can return non matched (id, price) as it did with your sample. Notice id 3 and price 6 in his answer – Clodoaldo Neto Jul 16 '13 at 0:36
2  
Looks sensible and correct, but it'd be great if you could explain your answers a little, especially for people who're having trouble with the basics. – Craig Ringer Jul 16 '13 at 1:27
    
@ClodoaldoNeto: Obviously my answer gives unmatched results -- that is, in fact, why I made a point of posting the results. But can you elaborate on why that makes it "wrong"? – ruakh Jul 16 '13 at 4:22
    
@ruakh By unmatched I mean the price does not belong to that id. – Clodoaldo Neto Jul 16 '13 at 10:56

The problem is that PostgreSQL has no way of knowing which items records you want to take values from; that is, it can't tell that you want this:

| id | condition | price |
--------------------------
|  1 | new       |     9 |
|  3 | good      |     3 |

and not this:

| id | condition | price |
--------------------------
|  1 | new       |     9 |
|  2 | good      |     5 |

To fix this, you need to use some sort of aggregation function, such as MAX:

SELECT MAX(id) AS id,
       condition,
       MAX(price) AS price
  FROM items
 WHERE product_id = 1
   AND status = 'in_stock'
 GROUP BY condition
 ORDER BY price ASC

which gives:

| id | condition | price |
--------------------------
|  1 | new       |     9 |
|  3 | good      |     5 |

(This restriction is part of the SQL standard, and most DBMSes enforce it. One exception is MySQL, which allows your query, but with the caveat that "The server is free to choose any value from each group, so unless they are the same, the values chosen are indeterminate" [link].)

share|improve this answer
    
That still produces the same error. Here's a fiddle: sqlfiddle.com/#!1/33786/2 - I changed condition to cond because it's reserved in SQL Fiddle. – dee Jul 16 '13 at 0:19
    
@dee: Oops, sorry. I've now fixed that by adding AS price (and AS id). – ruakh Jul 16 '13 at 0:31
    
BTW, newer PostgreSQL versions allow you to refer to any column of a table whose primary key you've listed in GROUP BY; they identify the functional dependency of the other columns on the primary key. So you don't have to aggregate other cols if you've mentioned the PK in newer versions. That's what the standard requires, but older versions weren't smart enough to figure it out and required all columns to be listed explicitly. – Craig Ringer Jul 16 '13 at 0:47
    
@CraigRinger then why would this not work: sqlfiddle.com/#!12/33786/3 - I believe that's the latest Postgres version. – dee Jul 16 '13 at 0:54
    
@dee Because that table has no PRIMARY KEY, and if it did it'd be id not cond. The query is invalid. If you were to group by id then you could refer to other columns, per this example: sqlfiddle.com/#!12/a37a9/1 . Since cond has multiple ocurrences of the same values the issue ruakh has already explained to you applies: which id should be returned for cond = good? – Craig Ringer Jul 16 '13 at 1:09

The SQL standard requires this behaviour, though some databases like MySQL ignore it and instead return unpredictable results.

If there's more than one row for "cond = good" and you ask for the "id" of the row where "cond = good", which row should the database give you? The row with id = 3, or id = 2? How should it know which to pick? MySQL picks an arbitrary row if there are multiple candidates, but this isn't allowed by the standard.

In your case you seem to want to pick the lowest-price row for each condition.

PostgreSQL provides an extension, DISTINCT ON ..., to help with this. Clodaldo has demonstrated this in his answer, so I won't repeat that here. Using DISTINCT ON will be much more efficient than the example below.

The SQL-standard way would be to use a window to rank the results, then filter on the ranked data. Unfortunately this is pretty inefficient as it requires all rows that match the inner where clause to be collected and sorted.

SELECT *
FROM (
  SELECT *, dense_rank() OVER w AS itemrank
  FROM items
  WHERE product_id = 1 AND items.status = 'in_stock'
  WINDOW w AS (PARTITION BY cond ORDER BY price ASC)
) ranked_items
WHERE itemrank = 1;

(http://sqlfiddle.com/#!1/33786/19)

Another SQL-standard way is to use an aggregation subquery to find the min prices for each category then display all rows with the min price:

SELECT *
FROM items INNER JOIN (
  SELECT cond, min(price) AS minprice
  FROM items
  WHERE product_id = 1 AND items.status = 'in_stock'
  GROUP BY cond
) minprices(cond, price)
ON (items.price = minprices.price AND items.cond = minprices.cond)
ORDER BY items.price;

Unlike the DISTINCT ON version, though, this will display multiple entries if the lowest priced item has more than one entry with the same cond and price.

So.. you should really use the DISTINCT ON approach, but you need to understand it. Start with the PostgreSQL documentation here.

On a side note, newer PostgreSQL versions allow you to refer to any column of a table whose primary key you've listed in GROUP BY; they identify the functional dependency of the other columns on the primary key. So you don't have to aggregate other cols if you've mentioned the PK in newer versions. That's what the standard requires, but older versions weren't smart enough to figure it out and required all columns to be listed explicitly.

That's what people who ask this question usually want to know, but doesn't apply strictly to your question since it turns out you're trying to use GROUP BY to filter rows.

share|improve this answer
    
Re: "MySQL picks one [...] using the ORDER BY clause if provided": Are you sure? The documentation explicitly denies that this is the case, so I find that surprising. – ruakh Jul 16 '13 at 4:19
    
@ruakh You're quite right; I thought it was like PostgreSQL's DISTINCT ON, but that's not the case according to the docs: "Furthermore, the selection of values from each group cannot be influenced by adding an ORDER BY clause" from dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en//group-by-extensions.html . Text corrected, anyway. – Craig Ringer Jul 16 '13 at 4:24
    
Thanks! +1. :-) – ruakh Jul 16 '13 at 4:36
    
@CraigRinger The problem with distinct on is it stops you from ordering the columns the way you want. If you select distinct on (condition) for example, you have to sort by condition first, then price. Which is really annoying. – dee Jul 17 '13 at 18:14
    
@Dee Sometimes getting well-defined and clear behaviour is annoying. In this case it's just SQL. You'll see that both the standard compliant approaches I've given above also need to join on or filter a subquery. You seem to want (or not mind) undefined behaviour where the database can just pick whatever row it feels like, and PostgreSQL will generally refuse to give you that. – Craig Ringer Jul 17 '13 at 23:40

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