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I was wondering what would be the most elegant way to write a Key Value Form encoded map to a http.ResponseWriter.

Respond(kv map[string]string) {
  for key, value := range kv {
    fmt.Fprintf(a.w, "%s:%s\n", key, value)
  }  
}

I have to follow this Key-Value format:

Key-Value Form Encoding

A message in Key-Value form is a sequence of lines. Each line begins with a key, followed by a colon, and the value associated with the key. The line is terminated by a single newline (UCS codepoint 10, "\n"). A key or value MUST NOT contain a newline and a key also MUST NOT contain a colon.

Additional characters, including whitespace, MUST NOT be added before or after the colon or newline. The message MUST be encoded in UTF-8 to produce a byte string.

I thought about using encoding/csv but isn't that a bit overkill?

Edit: What I came up with so far. (Thanks for all the suggested answers)

http://godoc.org/github.com/kugutsumen/encoding/keyvalue

https://github.com/kugutsumen/encoding/tree/master/keyvalue

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3 Answers 3

The standard library provides support for this: Look at http://godoc.org/net/url#Values.

You can do something like:

f := make(url.Values)
for k, v := range myMap {
    f.Set(k, v)
}
myOutput.WriteString(f.Encode())
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks it was a good hint... I started by writing my encode() function based on url.Values's encode() but didn't like that it used an array of string as value and the Add() method just appends to the array while the Get() method return the first entry in the array. Also the encoding I am using MUST follow Openid Auth 2.0 (4.1.1). –  Kugutsumen Jul 17 '13 at 22:41

If you want to write strings to any Writer in Go (including an http.ResponseWriter) without using the fmt package, you can use the bytes package to read the strings and write them to the Writer.

The code below creates a Buffer from the key and value strings using bytes.NewBufferString and then writes them to the http.ResponseWriter using the WriteTo function.

package main

import (
    "bytes"
    "log"
    "net/http"
)

func main() {
    kv := map[string]string{"key1": "val1", "key2": "val2", "key3": "val3", "key4": "val4", "key5": "val5"}
    http.HandleFunc("/", func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
        for key, value := range kv {
            kvw := bytes.NewBufferString(key + ":" + value + "\n")
            if _, err := kvw.WriteTo(w); err != nil {
                log.Fatal("Error: ", err)
            }
        }
    })
    if err := http.ListenAndServe("localhost:8080", nil); err != nil {
        log.Fatal("ListenAndServe: ", err)
    }
}

Will output:

key1:val1
key2:val2
key3:val3
key4:val4
key5:val5

Hopefully that's close to what you're after.

EDIT: You can also use the strings.Reader Type and the corresponding WriteTo function from the strings package.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't have problem using http.HandleFunc :) I was looking at something for efficient than calling fmt.Fprintf... –  Kugutsumen Jul 16 '13 at 8:55
    
I've edited my answer to use the bytes package instead of the fmt package. It may be closer to what you want. –  Intermernet Jul 16 '13 at 9:20
    
And you can also use the strings package for the same functionality. –  Intermernet Jul 16 '13 at 9:28
    
Thanks... I came up with a similar solution (see edit). Although I prefer allocated a buffer for my response just once and avoid concatanation using the +. I haven't benchmarked it but I guess that's probably the most efficient way I found so far. Most of the cost is in new buffer allocation. The cost is marginal for a single call... but on a platform where you are charged CPU time, I guess it makes sense to avoid expensive... apparently s1 + s2 + s3 compiles to a single runtime.concatstring call.. but you still have to do it for each key/value pair. –  Kugutsumen Jul 17 '13 at 22:33

For example,

package main

import (
    "bufio"
    "bytes"
    "fmt"
    "io"
)

func WriteRespond(w io.Writer, kv map[string]string) error {
    var buf bytes.Buffer
    for k, v := range kv {
        buf.WriteString(k)
        buf.WriteByte(':')
        buf.WriteString(v)
        buf.WriteByte('\n')
        _, err := buf.WriteTo(w)
        if err != nil {
            return err
        }
    }
    return nil
}

func main() {
    kv := map[string]string{
        "k1": "v1",
        "k2": "v2",
    }
    var buf = new(bytes.Buffer)

    w := bufio.NewWriter(buf)
    err := WriteRespond(w, kv)
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }
    err = w.Flush()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println(err)
        return
    }

    fmt.Println(buf.Bytes())
    fmt.Println(buf.String())
}

Output:

[107 49 58 118 49 10 107 50 58 118 50 10]
k1:v1
k2:v2
share|improve this answer
    
No need to check for error after write to a Buffer. Write functions for Buffer always return nil as error. –  Mostafa Jul 16 '13 at 11:00
    
@Mostafa: Comments are welcome. Don't change the answer. Your change was wrong. –  peterSO Jul 16 '13 at 16:21
    
Why not change? That’s how SO works. And what’s wrong with removing if clauses that are always false? –  Mostafa Jul 16 '13 at 17:00
    
@Mostafa: When I send code out for review, I don't get back a pile of mangled code. I get comments, with explanations, which point out errors and things that could be improved. Many of the comments are valuable, a few are plain wrong. I revise my code. Stack Overflow is a giant code review. You can make comments, which people may agree or disagree with, and you can post your own answer, which people can vote on. You rudely took working code and changed it so that no longer worked. Don't do that. Treat other people with respect. Assume that your changes might be wrong sometimes. –  peterSO Jul 16 '13 at 21:03
    
Thanks... I came up with a similar approach (see my answer). Main difference is I preallocate my buffer and return a string (it makes testing easier.) –  Kugutsumen Jul 17 '13 at 22:25

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