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I am unable to monkey patch a class inside a method body.

Within a method definition, I am trying to use a class in two ways:

1] Create an instance and use the orignal definition of a method in the class I am using

2] Monkey patch (pverride) a method in the class and now use an instance with the new method definition.

Basically I would be using both of the above instances of a class in my program.

The challenge is the method I am overriding gets called during initialization so I have to override it before I create the instance of the class.

Here is a small mock-up:

class A

  def initialize
   do_something
  end

  def do something
     #implementation
  end

end

Now , I want to use A in the same method twice , but once by using a modified version of do_something This is how I am trying to do it:

def my_method

  orig_instance = A.new

  #patch the class
  Class A          # ERROR: CLASS DEF IN METHOD BODY
   class << self
     alias_method :old_do_something, :do_something

     def self.do_something
        # new implementation
     end
  end

  new_instance = A.new

  #restore method
   class << self
     alias_method :do_something,:old_do_something

     def self.do_something
        # new implementation
     end
  end        



end # end of method

I get the (ERROR: CLASS DEF IN METHOD BODY) where I try to monkey patch the class, since I am trying to change the class inside of a method.

How do I achieve monkey patching the class in a method ?

Thanks

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by sawa, oldergod, bensiu, mishik, Soner Gönül Jul 17 '13 at 5:34

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You get the error above? Which error? And it's c, not C for class. – oldergod Jul 16 '13 at 0:33
    
Sorry, if you skimmed over the code , you could miss the ERROR marked in the code. Writing it again for clarity – codeObserver Jul 16 '13 at 2:19
    
slightly unrelated but i'm pretty sure // doesn't mark a comment in ruby – Justin L. Jul 16 '13 at 6:03
    
I changed some wording of the question to make it more clear. Hopefully this could be re-opened since its a real programming question and something I need for a real use-case. Thanks – codeObserver Jul 21 '13 at 18:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of using class Clazz; blabla; end to reopen Clazz and monkey patch it, you can use Module#class_eval, Module#instance_eval and some other meta-programming utilities/methods to do the same trick. And because that block accepted by these methods doesn't create new binding scopes, it is more convenient in meta-programming practice.

def my_method
  puts ">> creating orig_instance"
  orig_instance = A.new

  puts ">> dump orig_instance"
  orig_instance.do_something

  new_do_something = lambda do
    puts "Modified A#do_something"
  end

  # monkey patch class A so that the modified version of do_something get called
  # during initialization of new_instance
  A.class_eval do
    alias_method :old_do_something, :do_something
    define_method :do_something, new_do_something
  end

  puts ">> creating new_instance"
  new_instance = A.new

  puts ">> dump before do_something gets restored"
  new_instance.do_something
  orig_instance.do_something

  # add singleton method for the special instance
  # so that the instance always calls the modified do_something
  new_instance_singleton = class << new_instance; self end
  new_instance_singleton.send :define_method, :do_something, new_do_something

  # restore the modified do_something
  # so that orig_instance and all other instances (except new_instance) have the original definition
  A.class_eval do
    alias_method :do_something, :old_do_something
  end
  puts ">> dump for final result"
  new_instance.do_something
  orig_instance.do_something
end

And the following is the output of my_method call:

>> creating orig_instance
Original A#do_something
>> dump orig_instance
Original A#do_something
>> creating new_instance
Modified A#do_something
>> dump before do_something gets restored
Modified A#do_something
Modified A#do_something
>> dump for final result
Modified A#do_something
Original A#do_something
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Arie. Can you please explain why its necessary to add the singleton instance given that Class A is already monkey patched to use the new method definition. It not clear to me what "class << new_instance; self end" is doing especially after the new instance is already created. – codeObserver Jul 21 '13 at 4:05
    
@codeObserver I thought you want to make changes to the instance method of a special instance (starting from creation and lasting for the whole life time of the instance). If you restore the method without monkey patching for the special new_instance, new_instance will use the original implementation of the methods after restoring. The monkey patch to the singleton instance makes the new method be used in the whole lifetime of new_instance. If you just want to alter the behavior during creation, you can omit the patch to the singleton class. – Arie Shaw Jul 23 '13 at 2:02
    
@codeObserver class << new_instance; self end returns the eigenclass (or singleton class, ~Google it~) of the new_instance. That's a special class associated to the very new_instance. All the methods defined in that class will only be visible to new_instance. So that's the way to monkey patch a given instance rather than all instance of a given class. – Arie Shaw Jul 23 '13 at 2:06
    
I don't know if my question fits this thread, but I think #class_eval does not work for me, as, I want to redefine a method of a class that uses a class-constant: In your example, A.class_eval closes over the scope of #my_method while class A would close over the scope of class A. Thus, if in my redefined method, I try to access a (class-)constant defined in A, I will get a "uninitialized constant" error with #class_eval. That's why, I'm still wondering, how can I monkey-patch a class A inside of a method, like I would do with re-opening class A? – Andreas Rayo Kniep Jan 13 at 1:50

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