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How do I compare two hashes?

I have two ruby hashes (which are essentially models) and am trying to find the differences between them, one is an old instance of an object where the other has new values assigned to some attributes. I'm trying to determine which keys have changed, but there doesn't seem to be anything built into the Hash for this. I can think of a few brute forceish solutions, but was wondering if there is perhaps an elegant solution out there.

Ideally I need to be able to take two hashs like so:

element1 = {:name => "Original", :description => "The original one!"}
element2 = {:name => "Original", :description => "The new one!"}

And be able to compare/diff them and get something back like this:

{:description => "The new one!"}

Right now all I can really think of is iterating through the keys in one hash and comparing the value at that key to the corresponding key in the second hash, but that seems too brute forced.

Any ideas? Thanks a lot!

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marked as duplicate by casperOne Jul 25 '12 at 20:36

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

here is a slightly modified version from colin's.

class Hash
  def diff(other)
    (self.keys + other.keys).uniq.inject({}) do |memo, key|
      unless self[key] == other[key]
        if self[key].kind_of?(Hash) &&  other[key].kind_of?(Hash)
          memo[key] = self[key].diff(other[key])
        else
          memo[key] = [self[key], other[key]] 
        end
      end
      memo
    end
  end
end

It recurses into the hashes for more efficient left and right

{a: {c: 1, b: 2}, b: 2}.diff({a: {c: 2, b: 2}})

returns

{:a=>{:c=>[1, 2]}, :b=>[2, nil]}

instead of

{:a=>[{:c=>1, :b=>2}, {:c=>2, :b=>2}], :b=>[2, nil]}

Great idea colin

here is how to apply the diff to the original hashes

  def apply_diff!(changes, direction = :right)
    path = [[self, changes]]
    pos, local_changes = path.pop
    while local_changes
      local_changes.each_pair {|key, change|
        if change.kind_of?(Array)
          pos[key] = (direction == :right) ? change[1] : change[0]
        else
          path.push([pos[key], change])
        end
      }
      pos, local_changes = path.pop
    end
    self
  end
  def apply_diff(changes, direction = :right)
    cloned = self.clone
    path = [[cloned, changes]]
    pos, local_changes = path.pop
    while local_changes
      local_changes.each_pair {|key, change|
        if change.kind_of?(Array)
          pos[key] = (direction == :right) ? change[1] : change[0]
        else
          pos[key] = pos[key].clone
          path.push([pos[key], change])
        end
      }
      pos, local_changes = path.pop
    end
    cloned
  end 

so to make the left look like the right you run

{a: {c: 1, b: 2}, b: 2}.apply_diff({:a=>{:c=>[1, 2]}, :b=>[2, nil]})

to get

{a: {c: 2, b: 2}, b: nil}

to get exact we would have to go a little farther and record a difference between between nil and no key
and it would also be nice to shorten long arrays by just providing adds and removes

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I have found Rails' Hash diff method to not actually tell me what was on the left side and right side (which is far more useful). There was a plugin call "Riff", that has since disappeared, which would let you diff two ActiveRecord objects. Essentially:

class Hash
  def diff(other)
    self.keys.inject({}) do |memo, key|
      unless self[key] == other[key]
        memo[key] = [self[key], other[key]] 
      end
      memo
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
For my purpose I don't especially care since I really just need to know which fields have changed. If I were using AR this wouldn't be an issue, but everything is being abstracted through a data layer to CouchDB so I find myself needing to reinvent the wheel, so to speak, for some functionality. Thanks for the suggestion though. –  Chelsea Nov 19 '09 at 22:02
    
Which of course corresponds to your "brute force" comment, but I feel it's useful and not so awful or inelegant. –  Colin Curtin Nov 19 '09 at 22:02
    
This method won't notice additional keys in other hash neither would it be able to tell key absence from value being nil, for improved version check stackoverflow.com/a/19184270/54247 –  dolzenko Oct 4 '13 at 14:52

If all you care about is what's unique in element2, you can just do:

element2.to_a - element1.to_a
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2  
Doesnt seem to work if hash contains other hashes –  Sam Feb 7 '11 at 0:56
1  
True, because "identical" hashes don't count as equal... –  glenn mcdonald Feb 7 '11 at 4:40

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