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I have a problem with abstract class where we implement an interface. Now the interface is in our implementation of the abstract class other than the other implementation. I'll show you the code here:

@MappedSuperclass
public abstract class AbstractOrder {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long idOrder;

    @Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
    @Column(name="datum")
    private Date date = new Date();

    @OneToMany(targetEntity=IOrderLine.class)
    private List<IOrderLine> orderLines = new ArrayList<IOrderLine>();

    private String refOrder;
    ...
}

@Entity
@Table(name="supplyorders")
public class SupplyOrder extends AbstractOrder implements Comparable<SupplyOrder>, Serializable {

    @ManyToOne
    private Supplier supplier;

    @Enumerated(EnumType.STRING)
    private SupplyOrderStatus status = SupplyOrderStatus.TOBESUPPLIED;

    @ElementCollection
    private Set<CustomerOrder> customerOrders = new HashSet<CustomerOrder>();
    ...
}

@Entity
@Table(name="customerorders")
public class CustomerOrder extends AbstractOrder implements commparable<CustomerOrder>,Serializable {

    @ManyToOne
    private Customer customer;

    @ManyToOne
    private Place place;

    @ManyToOne
    private User vendor;

    private double deposit;

    @Enumerated(EnumType.STRING)
    private OrderStatus status = OrderStatus.CREATED;
}




@MappedSuperclass
public interface IOrderLine {
    double getSubTotal();
    int getQuantity();
    Furniture getFurniture();
}

@Entity
@Table(name="supplyorderlines")
public class SupplyOrderLine implements IOrderLine, Serializable {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;

    @OneToMany
    private List<CustomerOrderLine> customerOrderLines = new ArrayList<CustomerOrderLine>();
    ...
}

and of course a class CustormerOrderLine that implements IOrderLine.

Now for the supplyOrder they have supplyOrderLines in them and the customerOrder has the CustomerOrderLine in them.

The fault we get is that the abstract class doesn't know what implementation to take of the interface IOrderLine.

How can I override the field of orderLines from the abstract class in the implementation class and point to the implementation of the IOrderLine with annotations?

Thx in advance.

Chillworld

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean when you say "the abstract class doesn't know what implementation to take of the interface IOrderLine..." That doesn't make any sense to me. How does an abstract class "take" an interface? An abstract class should know nothing about its subclasses. –  jahroy Jul 16 '13 at 6:54
    
Its JPA that gives the error cause JPA does not know what table he must read for IorderLines, the supplyOrder and customerOrder takes different implementation of the interface IOrderLine and thx for formatting the code. –  chillworld Jul 16 '13 at 7:08
    
Ok... I get it. Answer coming. –  jahroy Jul 16 '13 at 7:15
    
thx jahroy, I appreciate your help. –  chillworld Jul 16 '13 at 7:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In Java you cannot instantiate an interface.

You can only instantiate actual classes that implement interfaces.

There's actually no such thing as IOrderLine.class.

You probably want to declare your orderLines field in your sub-classes.

In the sub-classes you can declare the field with a concrete class (that will map to a real database table).

If you need/want to use the abstract class to refer to your line items generically (this seems like a really good idea), you could use an abstract method that returns an interface.

Here's an example:

@MappedSuperclass
public abstract class AbstractOrder {
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long idOrder;

    @Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
    @Column(name="datum")
    private Date date = new Date();

    // This abstract method will be implemented by sub-classes
    public abstract List<IOrderLine> getOrderLines();
}

Then you can add the fields in your sub-classes and implement the abstract method that returns them:

@Entity
@Table(name = "supplyorderlines")
public class SupplyOrderLine implements IOrderLine, Serializable {

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    private Long id;

    @OneToMany(targetEntity = SupplyOrderLine.class)
    private List<SupplyOrderLine> customerOrderLines;

    @Override
    public List<IOrderLine> getOrderLines() {
        return customerOrderLines;
    }
}

If this wasn't about JPA entities, you could also do something like this:

public abstract class PojoClass {

    private Long idOrder;
    private Date date = new Date();
    private List<? extends IOrderLine> orderLines = new ArrayList<? extends IOrderLine>();
}

However, I don't think this is an option in a JPA entity.

That's because your entity class needs to map to a concrete class and database table.

share|improve this answer
    
Oke, I've descend the field to the implementation so I can implement the right class they need to have. Now its also a little more secure if they enter the wrong orderLine. Thx for you answer. –  chillworld Jul 16 '13 at 7:38
    
Ok... Don't give up on the idea of having a method in your abstract class that allows you to deal with all the sub-classes generically. That was a good idea on your part that you can still use. –  jahroy Jul 16 '13 at 7:40
    
Yeah I think I know also a way to implement it. I could use the annotations on the getters of the impl of the abstract class and put there the @ElementCollection(tagretClass=SuppyOrderLine.class) for the supplyOrder and for CustomerOrder the other implementation. (But you just need to override the getter of the abstract class) Greetz chill. –  chillworld Jul 16 '13 at 9:14
    
@chillworld - Cool. I believe the abstract method I suggested will do the trick. –  jahroy Jul 16 '13 at 9:16

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