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I have some private class member, representing random access array of std::deque containing some data:

std::vector<std::deque<SomeDataClass> > someMember;

I would like to provide a public class method which returns iterable data structure, containing all data elements from my array of deques:

std::deque<SomeDataClass> someMethod();

I would like this method go through all the deques in vector and copy every element on it's way to local std::deque, eventually returning this local std::deque by value. I'm trying to implement this method using C++11 auto and std::begin(), std::end():

std::deque<SomeDataClass> MyClassName::someMethod(){
    std::deque<DirectedEdge> allDataItems;
    std::deque<DirectedEdge>::iterator deqIter = allDataItems.begin();
    for(auto it = std::begin(someMember); it != std::end(someMember); ++it){
        std::copy(std::begin(*it), std::end(*it), deqIter);
    }

    return allDataItems;
}

I receive data access violation unhandled exception error on runtime in deque header. What is a mistake?

share|improve this question
6  
You should always use != for the ending condition when using iterators. Nothing says the next one is further ahead in memory. –  chris Jul 16 '13 at 7:39
    
Yeah sure, thanks. I'll edit my question, stupid mistake. I still have access violation. –  vard Jul 16 '13 at 7:40
    
@chris: Nothing says so apart from the standard, as long as the container is a vector. And anyway, for random access iterators, operator< does not tell you the order in memory, but the order in the logical sequence (for other iterator categories, it isn't defined at all). Since the only containers used in vard's code are vector and deque, which both have random access iterators, using operator< on them is perfectly fine (as long as both iterators belong to the same container, of course). –  celtschk Jul 16 '13 at 19:18
    
@celtschk, I knew someone would comment on that. Yes, random-access iterators will work fine with operator<, but I value being able to change something without breaking everything else. Using operator!= works with every iterator type. I should have made it a bit more clear, but my five minutes was up by the time I thought about it. –  chris Jul 16 '13 at 19:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

std::copy() requires the destination range to be large enough to hold the copy, but allDataItems is empty. You'd have to reserve space in allDataItems in advance (but that's not possible with std::deque). You should use a std::back_inserter (defined in <iterator>) instead:

std::deque<SomeDataClass> MyClassName::someMethod(){
    std::deque<DirectedEdge> allDataItems;
    for(auto it = std::begin(someMember); it < std::end(someMember); ++it){
        std::copy(std::begin(*it), std::end(*it), std::back_inserter(allDataItems));
    }

    return allDataItems;
}
share|improve this answer
5  
Consider doing allDataItems.insert(std::end(allDataItems), ...); instead. I'd say it's usually better to use members when possible. –  chris Jul 16 '13 at 7:45
3  
@chris You can make that a separate answer, so the OP can decide which they like better. –  Angew Jul 16 '13 at 8:37
    
Just add it to yours and then there's an even better answer :) –  chris Jul 16 '13 at 19:19
    
!= works instead of < and means that if someMember wasn't a random-access container, the code would still work. And if you don't need the iterator, for( auto const& x : someMember ) is clearer and shorter. –  Yakk Jul 16 '13 at 22:00

Here is an idomatic C+11 way to do it:

std::deque<SomeDataClass> MyClassName::someMethod() {
  std::deque<DirectedEdge> allDataItems;

  for( auto const& dq : someMember ) {
    allDataItems.insert( allDataItems.end(), std::begin(dq), std::end(dq) );
  }
  return allDataItems;
}

another way would be to write a concatinate function:

struct concatenate {
  template<typename Dest, typename Src>
  Dest&& operator()( Dest&& d, Src const& s ) const {
    using std::begin; using std::end;
    typename std::decay<Dest>::type retval = std::forward<Dest>(d);
    retval.insert( end(retval), begin(s), end(s) );
    return std::move(retval);
  }
};
std::deque<SomeDataClass> MyClassName::someMethod() {
  using std::begin; using std::end; // enable ADL
  return std::accumulate(
    begin(someMember), end(someMember),
    std::deque<DirectedEdge>(), concatenate()
  );
}

which is pretty cute. If you don't like std::accumulate,

std::deque<SomeDataClass> MyClassName::someMethod() {
  std::deque<DirectedEdge> allDataItems;

  for( auto const& dq : someMember ) {
    allDataItems = concatenate( std::move(allDataItems), dq );
  }
  return allDataItems;
}

both of which are roughly equivalently efficient.

share|improve this answer
    
@benvoigt renamed function to merriam_webster as requested. –  Yakk Jul 17 '13 at 2:01
    
lol, but you missed one in the text –  Ben Voigt Jul 17 '13 at 4:20

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