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I have a text stream like this
<device nid="05023CA70900" id="1" fblock="-1" type="switch" name="Appliance Home" brand="Google" active="false" energy_lo="427" />
<device nid="0501C1D82300" id="2" fblock="-1" type="switch" name="TELEVISION Home" brand="Google" active="pending" energy_lo="3272" />

from which i would like an output like
05023CA70900@@1@@-1@@switch@@Appliance Home@@Google@@false@@427 0501C1D82300@@2@@-1@@switch@@TELEVISION Home@@Google@@pending@@3272
There are many lines in the input all of which are not writable.

How can we achieve this using awk or sed ?

share|improve this question
    
Any reason you're parsing XML data using awk/sed? There are specialized tool for this. – anubhava Jul 16 '13 at 9:52
    
Using a shell script in an embedded system have very limited resources for the same.i dont have access to any tools on such a barebone of a system. @anubhava – Rohan Majumdar Jul 16 '13 at 9:55
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Following awk should work:

awk -F '"' '$1 == "<device nid=" { printf("%s@@%s@@%s@@%s@@%s@@%s@@%s@@%s\n", 
                    $2, $4, $6, $8, $10, $12, $14, $16)}' file

PS: It is not always best approach to parse XML using awk/sed.

share|improve this answer
    
Works like a charm my friend but just one little bit of help needed.Can we place a filter in awk itself which first detects if the line has a <device nid in the beginnig .Then it will suffice @anubhava – Rohan Majumdar Jul 16 '13 at 10:03
    
Ok check it now. – anubhava Jul 16 '13 at 10:05
    
lol :) You're most welcome, glad that it worked out for you. – anubhava Jul 16 '13 at 10:13
    
Thnx ! :) @anubhava – Rohan Majumdar Jul 16 '13 at 10:15

Its very simple in perl . So why not use perl ?

perl -lne 'push @a,/\"([\S]*)\"/g;print join "@@",@a;undef @a' your_file

Sample tested:

> cat temp
<device nid="05023CA70900" id="1" fblock="-1" type="switch" name="Appliance Home" brand="Google" active="false"  energy_lo="427" />  
<device nid="0501C1D82300" id="2" fblock="-1" type="switch" name="TELEVISION Home" brand="Google" active="pending"  energy_lo="3272" />  
> perl -lne 'push @a,/\"([\S]*)\"/g;print join "@@",@a;undef @a' temp
05023CA70900@@1@@-1@@switch@@Google@@false@@427
0501C1D82300@@2@@-1@@switch@@Google@@pending@@3272
>
share|improve this answer
    
I dont have perl on my embedded device.But anyways thanks for the suggestion. @Vijay – Rohan Majumdar Jul 17 '13 at 6:52
awk -F\" -v OFS="@@" '/^<device nid=/ { print $2, $4, $6, $8, $10, $12, $14, $16 }' file

or more generally:

awk -F\" '/^<device nid=/ {for (i=2;i<=NF;i+=2) printf "%s%s",(i==2?"":"@@"),$i; print ""}' file

To address your question in your comment: If you could have a tab in front of <device nid:

awk -F\" '/^\t?<device nid=// ...'

If you meant something else, update your question and provide more representative input.

share|improve this answer
    
And if there is a tab in front of the "device nid".Can you please tell how to account for that. @Ed Morton – Rohan Majumdar Jul 17 '13 at 6:53
    
I updated my answer to address that. – Ed Morton Jul 17 '13 at 11:04

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