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<a href="#" type="image"  class="topopup"  onclick="ShowDIV3();"  >Click Here</a>

In this code I need to execute another one function like validation if that function is true only the next function should run otherwise it won't be run. Can any one help me?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try like

<a href="#" type="image"  class="topopup"  onclick="ShowDIV3();"  >Click Here</a>

function ShowDIV3() {
    if(true)   //Here can use condition for validation
       another_fun();
    else
       return false;
}

call your another function when the condition is true at your showDIV3 function

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1  
Yes ,this is short and readable. –  sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Jul 16 '13 at 9:59
    
What is the reason to downvote it..?? –  Gautam3164 Jul 16 '13 at 10:21
1  
seems they just got the 125 rep :P. Move on brother..keep answering . –  sᴜʀᴇsʜ ᴀᴛᴛᴀ Jul 16 '13 at 10:23

Try this code :

<a href="#" type="image"  class="topopup"  onclick="if (ShowDIV3()) {myotherfunction()}">Click Here</a>
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if(whatever == true) is exactly equivalent to if(whatever). If you really want to check for true and only true (i.e., not something which evaluates to true, like 1, "some text" etc.), use if(whatever === true). –  Bart Jul 16 '13 at 9:56
    
Thanks Bart. I corrected. But my first code seems to work. –  Lucas Willems Jul 16 '13 at 9:58
1  
This should really be re-factored out the html. –  Willem D'haeseleer Jul 16 '13 at 9:58
1  
@LucasWillems Yes, testing for == true will work, but is quite pointless, because the if statement already evaluates its condition to a boolean value. The == operator is quite sloppy (or "helpful" if you will) which can be dangerous in some cases. I.e., 1 == true will evaluate to true, whereas 1 === true will evaluate to false, which is probably what you will want in most comparison cases. Keep that in mind. –  Bart Jul 17 '13 at 9:23
    
Thanks for your explication. –  Lucas Willems Jul 17 '13 at 9:25

Try this way

onclick=" if (ValidateFunction()) return ShowDIV3();"
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in jquery you could do it like this, this will also allow multiple handlers and better event normalization and improved separation of concerns.

$(".topopup").on("click", function(){
     if (ShowDIV3()){
         OtherStuff();
     }
});
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In your showDIV3() function at the end have something like this,

function showDIV3()
{
    // Your process, and then at the end,

    if(result)
    {
        // Call the other function
    }
    else 
    {
       // Return false
    }
}
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Why returning there and executing ?? why not simply ??

  function  ShowDIV3(){


      -----

    if(resultBoolean){
     proceedToanotherFunc();

    }

    }

Imho This would be more readable,other that writing logic there in html

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Do your validation in ShowDIV3() function, and depending on the validation call your next function from inside the ShowDIV3() function

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Just create more statement in your javascript like

function ValidateStatments() {

    var val = document.getElementById("Value 1").value;
    var val2 = document.getElementById("Value 2").value;


    if(val != "Value 1"){
        return false;
     }
    else if (val2 != "Value2){
        return false;
    }
return true;
}

and on your link add your javascript so if its true, it will allow the user to do the action onclick="return ValidateStatments();"

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