Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to use AJAX to process a simple login form. I thought it'd be pretty easy, but I just can't get it all to work.

index.php

<html>
<head>
<title>AJAX Login</title>
<script type="text/javscript">
var XMLHttpRequestObject = false;

if(window.XMLHttpRequest) {
    XMLHttpRequestObject = new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    else if (window.ActiveXObject) {
    	XMLHttpRequestObject = new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    	}

    function logIn() {
    	if(XMLHttpRequestObject) {
    		var obj = document.getElementById("show");
    		XMLHttpRequestObject.open("GET", "login.php");

    		XMLHttpRequestObject.onreadystatechange = function() {
    			if(XMLHttpRequestObject.readyState == 4
    			   && XMLHttpRequestObject.status == 200) {
    					obj.innerHtml = XMLHttpRequestObject.responseText;
    				}
    			}

    			XMLHttpRequestObject.send(null);
    		}
    	}

</script>
</head>
<body>
<form action="" method="post">
<table>
    <tr>
        <td>Username:</td>
        <td><input type="username" name="username" /></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>Password:</td>
        <td><input type="password" name="password" \ /></td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="2"><input type="submit" name="submit" value="login" onclick="logIn();" /></td>
    </tr>
</table>
</form>
<div id="show">should go here</div>
</body>
</html>

login.php

<?php
$username = "andrew";
$password = "andrew";

if($_POST['username'] != "") {
    if($_POST['password'] != "") {
    	if(($_POST['username'] == $username) && ($_POST['password'] == $password)) {
    		echo "Login Success!";
    		}
    		else {
    			echo "Login Failure!";
    			}
    		}
    		else {
    			echo "You didn't enter a password";
    			}
    		}
    		else {
    			echo "You didn't enter a username";
    			}
?>

When I click the "Login" button, nothing happens. :(

share|improve this question
    
I recommend you use some JavaScript library, for example jQuery. That makes AJAX so much easier and is working on all (or almost all) browsers. –  Franz Nov 20 '09 at 0:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you click login on that form it submits back to the source URL. To prevent this you should really change your event handler to either this:

function logIn() {
  ...
  return false;
}

Alternatively you can do it from the submit handler on the form instead of the click handler on the submit button.

Secondly, to do AJAX cross-browser you need about 6 fallback conditions, not just XmlHttpRequest. See Getting Started with AJAX and the XMLHttpRequest Object.

In all honesty, for AJAX there's no way I'd consider doing it without a helper library. My preferred choice is jQuery, in which case the code ends up looking like this:

<form id="loginform" method="post">
<table>
  <tr>
    <td>Username:</td>
    <td><input type="username" id="username" name="username" /></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Password:</td>
    <td><input type="password" id="password" name="password" \ /></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td colspan="2"><input type="button" id="login" value="Login"/></td>
  </tr>
</table>
</form>

with:

<script type="text/javascript">
$(function() {
  $("#login").click(function() {
    $("#show").load("login.php", {
      username: $("#username").val(),
      password: $("#password").val()
    }, function() {
      $("#loginform").hide(); // for example
    });
  });
});
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
Half right: because the onclick event isn't cancelled, the form does trigger a submit. But the AJAX .send() doesn't get called until the logIn() function fires, which isn't on page startup. –  Daniel Pryden Nov 20 '09 at 0:20
    
Also, while cross-browser compatibility is important, and jQuery definitely does make the job easier, XmlHttpRequest is supported by all the major browsers these days. So just using it without a fallback isn't as crazy as it used to be. –  Daniel Pryden Nov 20 '09 at 0:24
    
I guess that'll solve my problem. I've only messed with jQuery a little (played around with it when I found out about it), but recently I've been bored so I picked up an AJAX book at my school's library. Is there any point going through it and trying to learn AJAX, or should I go find some jQuery tutorials and attempt to learn that? –  Andrew Nov 20 '09 at 0:26
    
In all honesty I consider jQuery a "must-have" for Javascript development, particularly for Ajax. It just solves way too many cross-browser problems and is so small (under 20K and cacheable). IMHO there's just no reason (any more) to know the right sequence of objects to create to do a cross-browser XmlHttpRequest. –  cletus Nov 20 '09 at 0:28
    
Alrighty. I'll look into it. Thanks. :) –  Andrew Nov 20 '09 at 0:33

Your PHP script is expecting variables to be passed as an HTTP POST request, but your XMLHTTPRequest is doing a GET request.

You're also doing XMLHttpRequestObject.send(null); -- instead, you should be passing your POST data to the .send() method.

As others have pointed out, using a JavaScript library like jQuery will make this kind of thing a lot simpler.

share|improve this answer

You are not calling the logIn() function anywhere. Most likely, it belongs into the onsubmit event of the form. Don't forget to

return false;

at the end.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, he's got an <input type="submit"> with onclick="logIn();", so that isn't the issue. But the return false; is a good idea, because you want to cancel the onclick event, as it would otherwise trigger an onsubmit. –  Daniel Pryden Nov 20 '09 at 0:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.