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Why can't I put a function after main, visual studio cannot build the program. Is this a C++ quirk or a Visual Studio quirk?

eg.

int main()
{
   myFunction()
}

myFunction(){}

will produce an error that main cannot use myFunction

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1  
myFunction() is a syntax error, whereas myFunction(); isn't. You must first declare the function prototype before calling it. –  hetepeperfan Jul 16 '13 at 11:59
    
Maybe because you're calling myFunction without an overhead prototype before you defined it. –  0x499602D2 Jul 16 '13 at 11:59
    
You also forgot the semi-colon and the return type. myFunction(); and void myFunction() {} –  dotixx Jul 16 '13 at 11:59

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can, but you have to declare it beforehand:

void myFunction(); // declaration

int main()
{
   myFunction();
}

void myFunction(){} // definition

Note that a function needs a return type. If the function does not return anything, that type must be void.

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you have forgot semicolon after the function call. –  nio Jul 16 '13 at 11:59
    
@nio Thanks. It was cut and paste from the original, and I missed that mistake. –  juanchopanza Jul 16 '13 at 12:01
    
Great. Seems Obvious now. Thanks. –  GKitteridge Jul 16 '13 at 12:27

You cannot use a name/symbol which is not yet declared. That is the whole reason.

It is like this:

i = 10;  //i not yet declared

int i;

That is wrong too, exactly for the same reason. The compiler doesn't know what i is – it doesn't really care what it will be.

Just like you write this (which also makes sense to you as well as the compiler):

int i;  //declaration (and definition too!)

i = 10;  //use

you've to write this:

void myFunction(); //declaration!

int main()
{
   myFunction() //use
}

void myFunction(){}  //definition

Hope that helps.

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Can one call main() from a function on the upper side of main()? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 16 '13 at 12:10
    
@huseyintugrulbuyukisik: In C++, calling main() from your code is forbidden. A good compiler should give you error (or at least warning). main() is called by the runtime. –  Nawaz Jul 16 '13 at 12:10
    
Ok. Thank you. Just wondered that main could be seen from anywhere I know its nonsense but I wondered. :) –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 16 '13 at 12:11

Because

myFunction()

has to be declared before using it. This is c++ behaviour in general.

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Functions need to be declared before they can be used:

void myFunction();

int main() {
  myFunction();
}

void myFunction() {
  ...
}
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you have to forward declare a function so main can know that there is some.

void myFunction();

int main()
{
   myFunction();
}

void myFunction(){}

Don't forget about putting ; after each command.

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Of course you can, declare it first. Or better, put the declaration in a header and #include it in the source file.

void myFunction();

int main()
{
   myFunction();
}

void myFunction(){}
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specify the function declaration before calling function .So that compiler will know about return type and signature

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You have to declare the function before.

void myFunction();

int main()
{
    myFunction()
 }

 myFunction(){}
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