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I have written a small program which hooks into the keyboard and changes the registry value on keypress. Here is the callback code:

LRESULT WINAPI keyDownEvent(int nCode, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
    if ((wParam == WM_SYSKEYDOWN) || (wParam == WM_KEYDOWN))
    {
        KBDLLHOOKSTRUCT kbdStruct = *(((KBDLLHOOKSTRUCT *) lParam));
        if ((kbdStruct.vkCode == VK_LWIN) || (kbdStruct.vkCode == VK_RWIN)) 
        {
        RegSetValueEx(key, TEXT("MakeAllAppsDefault"), NULL, REG_DWORD, (const BYTE*) DISABLE_APPS_VIEW, sizeof(DISABLE_APPS_VIEW)); // Set value to 0 (OFF)
        }
    }
     return CallNextHookEx(NULL, nCode, wParam, lParam); // Pass info to next hook procedure
}

The return value from RegSetValueEx == ERROR_SUCCESS, that means the value is being set but when I open the registry, the value is still the same. Is there something that I am doing wrong?

DWORD DISABLE_APPS_VIEW = 0;
DWORD ENABLE_APPS_VIEW = 1;
share|improve this question
    
What are DISABLE_APPS_VIEW and ENABLE_APPS_VIEW ? –  Jonathan Potter Jul 16 '13 at 12:17
    
@JonathanPotter : DWORD DISABLE_APPS_VIEW = 0; DWORD ENABLE_APPS_VIEW = 1; –  noobprohacker Jul 16 '13 at 12:21
    
Looks like you're not passing the address of them to RegSetValueEx. –  Jonathan Potter Jul 16 '13 at 12:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Replace

RegSetValueEx(key, TEXT("MakeAllAppsDefault"), NULL, REG_DWORD,
(const BYTE*) DISABLE_APPS_VIEW, sizeof(DISABLE_APPS_VIEW)); // Set value to 0 (OFF)

by

RegSetValueEx(key, TEXT("MakeAllAppsDefault"), NULL, REG_DWORD,
(const BYTE*) &DISABLE_APPS_VIEW, sizeof(DISABLE_APPS_VIEW)); // Set value to 0 (OFF)

In other words : put a & in front of DISABLE_APPS_VIEW. You must pass the address of your DWORD variable to RegSetValueEx and not the value itself.

BTW you shouldn't put variable names in "all capitals", as by convention in C and C++ "all capitals" names are usually used for preprocessor defined constants (e.g. #define MYCONSTANT 123).

share|improve this answer
    
Oh crap.. such a silly mistake. Thanks a lot! –  noobprohacker Jul 16 '13 at 13:24

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