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I have a mysql query which interact from 2 tables, 'properties' and 'offers'.

The 'offers' table has can match a record in the property table by either referring to a specific record by a unique code or by the county or region the property is located.

Here's an example of my query...

SELECT *, ROUND(((3959 * acos(cos(radians(51.1080390)) * cos(radians(latitude)) * cos(radians(longitude) - radians(-4.1610140)) + sin(radians(51.1080390)) * sin( radians(latitude)))) * 2),0)/2 AS `distance`
FROM `properties` AS prop
LEFT JOIN `offers` ON prop.code = offers.the_property
LEFT JOIN `offers` AS offsCnty ON prop.county = offsCnty.the_county
LEFT JOIN `offers` AS offsRgn ON prop.region = offsRgn.the_region
HAVING distance <= 2.5
ORDER BY `sleeps` ASC, `distance` ASC
LIMIT 0, 10

In the offers table the are 3 columns the_property / the_county / the region are crucial for linking the appropriate offer with the property/ies. If an offer is to be applied to the entire county, the field the_property is blank, otherwise if an offer is for a specific property this field contains the unique property code.

I thought that by using multiple JOIN's would be the solution, however when the any of the 3 main offer fields are empty the join returns 'NULL' for the offers table fields.

How can this be resolved??

Many thanks

share|improve this question
1  
LEFT JOIN means that if there's no row that matches the ON condition, it should fill it in with NULL. But as long as it matches one of the 3 joins, you should get non-null values in that set of columns. – Barmar Jul 16 '13 at 13:09
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can join the two tables and specify your extra join conditions in the join clause or the where clause

SELECT *, ROUND(((3959 * acos(cos(radians(51.1080390)) * cos(radians(latitude)) * cos(radians(longitude) - radians(-4.1610140)) + sin(radians(51.1080390)) * sin( radians(latitude)))) * 2),0)/2 AS `distance`
FROM `properties` AS prop
LEFT JOIN `offers` ON prop.code = offers.the_property 
       OR prop.county = offers.the_county 
       OR prop.region = offers.the_region
HAVING distance <= 2.5
ORDER BY `sleeps` ASC, `distance` ASC
LIMIT 0, 10
share|improve this answer
    
I think it should be OR, not AND. – Barmar Jul 16 '13 at 13:13
    
@Barmar oh thanks again :) – DevZer0 Jul 16 '13 at 13:14
    
But I'm not sure this is right, because then it can match multiple rows in offers, and he just wants a single row per property. – Barmar Jul 16 '13 at 13:15
    
@Barmar so then 3 unions would probably do the trick – DevZer0 Jul 16 '13 at 13:19
    
Thanks for your assistance @Barmar @DevZer0 :), regarding your point about if multiple offers exist for a particular property record/row, either by matching the the_county or the_property, would it be possible to do a COUNT(*) as a dynamic column to count the offers, then i will just display the first offer and show more offers are available for the particular property. – David G Jul 16 '13 at 13:29

Columns from later offers tables overwrite earlier ones, you need to alias them:

SELECT *, offers.the_property the_property_from_offers, ...

share|improve this answer

You have three different offers tables all with the same field names. The problem is that MySQL does not allow multiple columns with the same name.

The easiest fix is to change the join to use or in the on clause:

SELECT *, ROUND(((3959 * acos(cos(radians(51.1080390)) * cos(radians(latitude)) * cos(radians(longitude) - radians(-4.1610140)) + sin(radians(51.1080390)) * sin( radians(latitude)))) * 2),0)/2 AS `distance`
FROM `properties` prop LEFT JOIN
     `offers`
      ON prop.code = offers.the_property or
         (prop.county = offsCnty.the_county and offers.the_property is null) or
         prop.region = offsRgn.the_region
HAVING distance <= 2.5
ORDER BY `sleeps` ASC, `distance` ASC
LIMIT 0, 10;

If you do use multiple joins, then you should have expressions such as the following in the select clause:

select coalesce(offers.code, offsCnty.code, offsRgn.code) as code

for each column in the offers table.

share|improve this answer
    
MySQL allows multiple columns with the same names, it prefixes them with the table alias in the results. However, the PHP APIs discard the prefixes, so you need to use numeric column indexes to access them all. – Barmar Jul 16 '13 at 13:22

If you want the most specific offer to take precedence, I think you have to write it like this:

SELECT prop.*,
       COALESCE(offers.col1, offsCnty.col1, offsRgn.col1) col1,
       COALESCE(offers.col2, offsCnty.col2, offsRgn.col2) col2,
       ...,
       <huge formula> distance
FROM `properties` AS prop
LEFT JOIN `offers` ON prop.code = offers.the_property
LEFT JOIN `offers` AS offsCnty ON prop.county = offsCnty.the_county
LEFT JOIN `offers` AS offsRgn ON prop.region = offsRgn.the_region
HAVING distance <= 2.5
ORDER BY `sleeps` ASC, `distance` ASC
LIMIT 0, 10
share|improve this answer

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