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For reference, please see the jsFiddle link here. Here's a short script that displays a stackoverflow-style popup message. What I want to do is give the user the option of either letting the message go away on it's own after 5 seconds or to dismiss the message by clicking the 'X' on the right side of the message dialog.

I've tried to add a delay:

$("#message").fadeIn('slow').delay(5000).queue(function() {
    $('#message').fadeOut('slow');
});

Which will work, but then the onClick event on the 'X' link to close the message dialog won't fire.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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2  
Clicking the 'X' works fine...you have to make sure you're not clicking on 'Result` in the fiddle corner, then it wont fire. –  tymeJV Jul 16 '13 at 13:11
    
@tymeJV Correct, it does work, but when I add the delay to fadeOut the DIV after 5 seconds, the onClick no longer works. I would like to have both - meaning, if the user doesn't close the dialog after 5 seconds, then it will close itself. –  Andy Evans Jul 16 '13 at 13:14
2  
I changed your CSS styling for #message to top:80 to get it off of the Result indicator. –  DevlshOne Jul 16 '13 at 13:14
1  
Note that you don't need .queue(), you can just say $("#message").fadeIn('slow').delay(5000).fadeOut('slow'); –  nnnnnn Jul 16 '13 at 13:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

$("#message").fadeIn('slow').delay(5000).fadeOut('slow');

$('#message a.close-notify').click(function () {
    $('#message').stop().fadeOut('slow', removeMessageLayer);
    $('#messageContainer').text();
    return false;
});

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/xSRk8/15/

The reason why clicking the X to close stopped working when you added the automatic fade is that jQuery queues up animation methods, so in your click handler where you tried to fadeOut() the element that fade out was added to the queue after the delay. If you call .stop() it cancels any existing queued effects so you can do the fadeOut() immediately.

Also your removeMessageLayer() function wasn't actually removing the message element at all - you just thought it was gone because it had faded out. Your code

$('body').remove('#message');

...says to remove the body element if it matches the selector passed to remove(), which of course it never would. You need $('#message').remove();, and you don't need to test whether the message element exists first because jQuery essentially ignores the .remove() if called on an empty jQuery object. So use this:

function removeMessageLayer() {
    $('#message').remove();
}
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That was it! Thanks! –  Andy Evans Jul 16 '13 at 13:48

Probably not the cleanest, but you could add a setTimeout call at the end of your displayMessage function.

    timeout = setTimeout(function() {
        $('#message').fadeOut('slow');
        $('#messageContainer').text();
        removeMessageLayer();
        return false;
    }, 5000);

And then in your click handler, call clearTimeout(timeout) to cancel the timeout.

I've updated your fiddle with this. Seems to work.

UPDATE: the code isn't clean -- I repeated some things. But I'll leave the clean up as a future exercise. :)

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$(body).on('click','#message a.close-notify',function () {
    $('#message').fadeOut('slow');
    $('#messageContainer').text();
    removeMessageLayer();
    return false;
});

because it is a dynamically created element, best practice says the click event should be delegated.

    $("#message").fadeIn('slow',function() {
        $(this).delay(5000).fadeOut('slow');
    });

This will give you your five second delay based on the successful creation of the message.

share|improve this answer
    
A delegated handler may be more sensible, but you don't need one in this case because the OP's code only called .click() after creating the element in question. –  nnnnnn Jul 16 '13 at 13:34
1  
I'm simply trying to promote best practice while answering questions. You're right, it's not NECESSARY but it is preferred and I've edited my answer to reflect that. –  DevlshOne Jul 16 '13 at 13:35
    
Note that if using a delegated handler like that, that code should be moved out of the displayMessage() function, otherwise it'll bind additional handlers every time a message is displayed. –  nnnnnn Jul 16 '13 at 13:42
    
Would you be happier if I just deleted my answer? –  DevlshOne Jul 16 '13 at 13:43
    
Sorry. No, I think a delegated handler is a fine alternative here. –  nnnnnn Jul 16 '13 at 15:21

The code will be (tested )

$("#message").fadeIn('slow').delay(5000).fadeOut('slow'); // display message div
$('#message-close').click(function () {   // click close button
$('#message').stop().fadeOut('slow');

 return false;
});

$(document).on('keydown', function(e) {

if (e.keyCode === 27) {
   $('#message').stop().fadeOut('slow'); // close div when Esc key is pressed
      }
  });
});
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