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I am trying understand the need of override and virtual in C#,so I wrote the following code:

using System;
namespace Override
{
    class Base 
    {
        public virtual void method() 
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Base method");
        }
    }
    class Derived : Base 
    {
        public override void method()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Derived method");
        }
    }
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Derived d = new Derived();
            d.method();
        }
    }
}

And I was expecting "Derived method" to be called and printed.Then I wrote the following code without using virtual/override combination.

using System;
namespace Override
{
    class Base 
    {
        public void method() 
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Base method");
        }
    }
    class Derived : Base 
    {
        public void method()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Derived method");
        }
    }
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Derived d = new Derived();
            d.method();
        }
    }
}

And I got the same result i.e. "Derived method" called and printed.My question is if the code worked without virtual/override as I expected,what is the need of them? or am I missing something here?

share|improve this question
    
Don't you get a warning in the second one about hiding a method? "'Derived.Method()' hides inherited member Base.Method()'. Use the new keyword if hiding was intended. " –  Sayse Jul 16 '13 at 13:29
    
Thank you all for the answers,now I am clear with this concept –  ZoomIn Jul 16 '13 at 13:39

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In your source code, you are always doing simple inheritance without any polymorphic behavior. You are always created instance of derived class and assigning it to derived class instance variable.

DerivedClass d = new DerivedClass(); // here no polymorphism, and only inheritance is there

So When you will call method using class variable, it will always call DerivedClass method, no matter if the method is virtual or not in parent class.

In Polymorphism, your programs do not know the exact type of class on which you are calling the method (this concept is called late-binding). As in example below:

BaseClass b = new DerivedClass(); // here b is a base class instance but initiated using derived class

After calling b.method() it will do late binding and will show polymorphic behavior (only if the method has been set virtual in the base class)

NOTE: The virtual keyword delays binding to correct version of method to runtime and is core keywork to implement polyphorphism. So for exact polymorphic behavior, declare methods as virtual in parent class, and then in child class, ovverride that method.

share|improve this answer

virtual allows the correct version of the method to be chosen at runtime, based on information not available at compile time. Consider the following tweak to your example:

using System;
namespace Override
{
    class Base 
    {
        public virtual void method() 
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Base method");
        }
    }
    class Derived : Base 
    {
        public override void method()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Derived method");
        }
    }
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Derived d = new Derived();
            Base b = d;
            b.method();
        }
    }
}

With virtual/override, this code will display Derived method, as at runtime we can see that b is really a Derived instance. Without virtual/override, it will display Base method, as the declared type of b is Base.

share|improve this answer

Here is the test you are missing:

Base d = new Derived();
d.method(); // "Derived method"

Base b = new Base();
b.method(); // "Base method"

Also imagine if you had a collection of Base objects that were composed of different inherited objects. The virtual keyword allows those Base objects to understand what type they really are at runtime.

List<Base> collection = new List<Base>();
collection.Add(new Base());
collection.Add(new Derived()};
collection.Add(new Base());

foreach(Base b in collection)
{
     b.method(); // will print out "Base" or "Derived" correctly
}
share|improve this answer

see the DIFFERENCE

        class Base 
        {
            public void method() 
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Base method");
            }
        }
        class Derived : Base 
        {
            public void method()
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Derived method");
            }
        }
        class Program
        {
            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                Derived d;

                d = new Derived();
                d.method();

                d = new Base();
                d.method();
            }
        }

OUTPUT :
Derived method
Derived method

            class Base 
            {
                public virtual void method() 
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Base method");
                }
            }
            class Derived : Base 
            {
                public override void method()
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Derived method");
                }
            }
            class Program
            {
                static void Main(string[] args)
                {
                    Derived d;

                    d = new Derived();
                    d.method();

                    d = new Base();
                    d.method();
                }
            }

OUTPUT :
Derived method
Base method

share|improve this answer
    
That won't even compile, can't set d to new Base().. Your example is trying to do the same as Chowletts answer also –  Sayse Jul 16 '13 at 13:51

Base class pointers can be used to point to object of the base class or any object derived from the base. So the need of virtual methods come into picture when base class object point to derived class

Base d = new Derived();
d.method(); // "Derived method"
share|improve this answer

The method 'method' on the Derived class will hide the implementation of the Base class which is why you got the messaged "Derived method".

There are many uses of virtual and abstract but one example is where you have functionality in the base class which may not fit all cases of classes that inherit from your base class. Using virtual allows another class to completely override that functionality and provide its own implementation.

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