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private readonly Dictionary<ExcelCellIdentifier, int> allInfoByIdentifier = new Dictionary<ExcelCellIdentifier, int>();

public class ExcelCellIdentifier
{
    public ExcelCellIdentifier(string ticker, string identifier)
    {
        Ticker = ticker;
        Identifier = identifier;
    }
    public string Ticker { get; set; }
    public string Identifier { get; set; }
}

Then at some point I would like to search for the int by creating an ExcelCellIdentifier object with the same ticker and identifier, like:

ExcelCellIdentifier ex = new ExcelCellIdentifier("Ticker1", "Identifier1");
int a = allInfoByIdentifier[ex];
//a is a value stored before hand

Is this possible?

share|improve this question
1  
You have either typed this code or copied it from something. Either way this is code that now exists. In the time it took you to make this post you could have simply shoved it into Visual Studio and hit F5. If you have tried it already and are having problems, please let us know what the problems were. –  Arran Jul 16 '13 at 14:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because no one else has given you a proper version using IEquateable here you go

public class ExcelCellIdentifier : IEquatable<ExcelCellIdentifier>
{
   public ExcelCellIdentifier(string ticker, string identifier)
   {
        Ticker = ticker;
        Identifier = identifier;
   }

   public override bool Equals(object obj)
   {
      var identifier = obj as ExcelCellIdentifier;
      if(identifier == null)
          return false;
      else
          return Equals(identifier);
   }

   public override int GetHashCode()
   {
      //All this below is a common performance thing I add, if you have the two strings "Foo" and "Bar" it will give you a different hash code than the string "Bar" and "Foo", it gives you a better distribution of the hash.
      unchecked
      {
          int hash = 17;
          hash = hash * 23 + Ticker.GetHashCode();
          hash =  hash * 23 + Identifier.GetHashCode();
          return hash;
      }
   }

   public string Ticker { get; set; } //This should likely be changed to {get; private set;}
   public string Identifier { get; set; } //This should likely be changed to {get; private set;}

   public bool Equals(ExcelCellIdentifier other)
   {
      return Ticker.Equals(other.Ticker) && Identifier.Equals(other.Identifier);
   }
}

Change these two methods to the following to remove case sensitivity to the strings

   public override int GetHashCode()
   {
      //All this below is a common performance thing I add, if you have the two strings "Foo" and "Bar" it will give you a different hash code than the string "Bar" and "Foo", it gives you a better distribution of the hash.
      unchecked
      {
          int hash = 17;
          hash = hash * 23 + StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase.GetHashCode(Ticker);
          hash =  hash * 23 + StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase.GetHashCode(Identifier);
          return hash;
      }
   }

   public string Ticker { get; set; } //This should likely be changed to {get; private set;}
   public string Identifier { get; set; } //This should likely be changed to {get; private set;}

   public bool Equals(ExcelCellIdentifier other)
   {
      return StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase.Equals(Ticker, other.Ticker) && StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase.Equals(Identifier, other.Identifier);
   }
share|improve this answer
    
The GetHasCode throws an error. obj isn't in the scope –  Alexey Jul 16 '13 at 15:13
    
Refresh, I made a few miskates at first, and I override int GetHashCode() the other code is doing int GetHashCode(ExcelCellIdentifier obj) which is wrong for IEquateable. –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 16 '13 at 15:15
    
And what is the unchecked block? –  Alexey Jul 16 '13 at 15:17
    
99% of the time it is not needed, as it is already the default behavior, but if you set your compiler to do checked arithmetic you will get a OverflowExecption if the value of hash becomes more than int.MAX_VALUE. If you are unchecked it just wraps around to int.MIN_VALUE. –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 16 '13 at 15:31
1  
Arbitrary, they are both non small prime numbers to help make collisions less frequent. The pattern is the initial number is hash = X then every property you add to the hash is hash = Y * hash + newValue. X must be non 0 and Y must be > 1. –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 16 '13 at 16:03

From the documentation:

Dictionary<TKey, TValue> requires an equality implementation to determine whether keys are equal. You can specify an implementation of the IEqualityComparer<T> generic interface by using a constructor that accepts a comparer parameter; if you do not specify an implementation, the default generic equality comparer EqualityComparer<T>.Default is used. If type TKey implements the System.IEquatable<T> generic interface, the default equality comparer uses that implementation.

It's up to you to decide how you want equality to work in this case - either provide a comparer when you construct the dictionary or implement IEquatable<T>. The middle option doesn't work for you, since the default comparer for reference types uses reference equality.

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yes, you can do this as long as you either implement IEquatable<ExcelCellIdentifier> in your ExcelCellIdentifier class, or instantiate the dictionary with an instance of IEqualityComparer<ExcelCellIdentifier>.

One important thing to remember is that although I don't think IEquatable<T> forces you to override GetHashCode() (even though as commented below it's mandated in the documentation), you need to make sure you override it appropriately, otherwise even if your objects return true for Equals(), one won't work as a key to find the other in the dictionary.

This is a cause of lots of fun debugging where you're sure your equality comparer is working fine, but somehow your dictionary isn't retrieving anything!

For my money, I prefer to implement a custom equality comparer, which keeps the business of managing your dictionary separate from the implementation of your class:

    private readonly Dictionary<ExcelCellIdentifier, int> allInfoByIdentifier =
        new Dictionary<ExcelCellIdentifier, int>(new ExcelCellIdentifierComparer());

    public class ExcelCellIdentifier
    {
        private ExcelCellIdentifier(string ticker, string identifier)
        {
            Ticker = ticker;
            Identifier = identifier;
        }

        public string Ticker { get; set; }

        public string Identifier { get; set; }

    }

    private class ExcelCellIdentifierComparer : IEqualityComparer<ExcelCellIdentifier>
    {
        public bool Equals(ExcelCellIdentifier x, ExcelCellIdentifier y)
        {
            return x.Identifier == y.Identifier && x.Ticker == y.Ticker;
        }

        public int GetHashCode(ExcelCellIdentifier obj)
        {
            return obj.Identifier.GetHashCode() ^ obj.Ticker.GetHashCode();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
IEquateable<T> does "require" you to overide GetHashCode() and overide Equals(obj). If you read the documentation and read the "Notes to Implementers" section it says you must do it. Never use a API without reading the documentation, just because the interface does not auto generate something does not mean you don't have to do extra work for it to work properly. –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 16 '13 at 14:48
    
I meant require as in "won't compile if you don't" –  Jon G Jul 16 '13 at 14:56
    
There is a lot more to programming than just getting something to compile, that is why I said you should always read the documentation. –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 16 '13 at 15:10
    
Wise words, @ScottChamberlain. In the context of my answer, would you not agree that it was worth pointing out this potential gotcha though? I didn't feel I should just assume the questioner had read all the relevant documentation. The docs also tell you to override equality and inequality operators, which although nice to have, are not as necessary as properly implementing GetHashCode() –  Jon G Jul 16 '13 at 15:34
    
Oh, no, I am in full agreement with you, I just did not like the original word choice (I think the change from "requires" to "forces" was a very good idea) –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 16 '13 at 15:40

as Damien_The_Unbeliever said, what you need is:

public class myClass
{
  private readonly Dictionary<ExcelCellIdentifier, int> allInfoByIdentifier =
  new Dictionary<ExcelCellIdentifier, int>(new ExcelCellIdentifier());

  public void testIt()
  {
     allInfoByIdentifier.Add(new ExcelCellIdentifier("Ticker1", "Identifier1"), 4);
     ExcelCellIdentifier ex = new ExcelCellIdentifier("Ticker1", "Identifier1");
     int a = allInfoByIdentifier[ex];
  }
}

   public class ExcelCellIdentifier : IEqualityComparer<ExcelCellIdentifier>
{
  public ExcelCellIdentifier()
  {

  }
    public ExcelCellIdentifier(string ticker, string identifier)
    {
        Ticker = ticker;
        Identifier = identifier;
    }

    public string Ticker { get; set; }

    public string Identifier { get; set; }

    public bool Equals(ExcelCellIdentifier x, ExcelCellIdentifier y)
    {
       return x.Identifier == y.Identifier && 
          x.Ticker == y.Ticker;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(ExcelCellIdentifier obj)
    {
       return obj.Identifier.GetHashCode() ^ 
          obj.Ticker.GetHashCode();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
1  
One thing though, the properties GetHashCode and Equals rely on must be immutable while the object is acting as a key in the collection. Changing a value while it still is held by the collection will cause errors in your program. A easy way to protect yourself from accidentally changing the values is change the properties to { get; private set; } –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 16 '13 at 14:28
1  
Also you used the wrong interface, you should have used IEquateable<T>, IEqualityComparer<T> is for creating a separate comparer class. See the last line from Damien's quote. –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 16 '13 at 14:30
    
This is a bit of an odd way to do it, you're implementing the equality comparer (the object you pass to the dictionary to tell it how to handle comparison) in the same class as the dictionary key. Either implement IEquatable or separate into two classes –  Jon G Jul 16 '13 at 14:33
    
@ScottChamberlain you are absolutely correct... –  No Idea For Name Jul 16 '13 at 14:34
    
I get a warning that says it override Object.Equals(object o) but does not override Object.GetHashCode() –  Alexey Jul 16 '13 at 14:40

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