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For some reason, when I append what I know are numbers on a matrix, what i get is a couple of arrays with nan. e.g: [[nan nan nan nan nan ] [nan nan nan nan nan]] and though it sounds funny, it's really frustrating.

What I'm doing is taking some data from a file and trying to make it like a matrix. The file has columns and, of course, numbers. The columns represents the temperature, pressure and things like that. My goal is that my matrix has the number of lines which corresponds the number of columns of my file and the number of columns of the matrix would be the same as the number of data. Why the opposite? because I saw something like:

   >>> import numpy
   >>> a = numpy.zeros(shape=(5,2))
   >>> a
   array([[ 0.,  0.],
   [ 0.,  0.],
   [ 0.,  0.],
   [ 0.,  0.],
   [ 0.,  0.]])
   >>> a[0] = [1,2]
   >>> a[1] = [2,3]
   >>> a
   array([[ 1.,  2.],
   [ 2.,  3.],
   [ 0.,  0.],
   [ 0.,  0.],
   [ 0.,  0.]])

here in Stack Overflow and I thought 'Oh,is just a matter of appending the numbers and making each line as a column!' so if I want my column 1 (that could be temperature for example) I would just put col[1] and I would have all the data in that column (and probably I would be able to plot it, which is my final achievement). But I believe I'm doing this append wrong and here is what have now:

    matrix = np.zeros(shape=ncolumns,ndata)) #creates a zeros array numberofcolums x numberofdata
    test = [] #list for float numbers
    ytest = [] #just for appending stuff                        
    for k in range(ncolumns):                       
        for data in plot_arrayy: #plot_array is where my data is stored
            matrix[k] = data        

    print matrix

I don't believe that I need three 'for's here, but I put it there because it was giving NaN and before the data was actually str, but now there's no excuse for it and still with the same error.

So what is it? Am I appending wrong? I'm not really used to matrices. (I just used them once).

EDIT: I followed the advice here, but the numbers are repeating and the final matrix turns to be, for example: [[3, 3, 3, 3, 3] [3, 3, 3, 3, 3] ...] instead of [[3, 4, 6, 5, 3] [8, 3, 9, 0, 1] ...] :/

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

matrix[k] = ytest.append(dat) does not do what you think it does! Instead try matrix[k] = dat for assigning each dat to [k], or to do what I think you're trying to, do

for i in xrange(ndata):
    matrix[k][i] = test[i]

or better yet matrix[k] = test

Also, matrix = np.zeros(shape=ncolumns,ndata)) isn't valid python, try matrix = np.zeros([nrows,ncols])

edit: Here is an explicit example.

import numpy as np
import random

test_data = [[random.randint(0,10) for _ in xrange(4)] for _ in xrange(20)]
ncols=4
nrows=20

matrix = np.zeros(shape=(nrows,ncols))               
for k in xrange(nrows):                       
    matrix[k] = test_data[k]

Our test data:

>>> test_data
[[5, 1, 1, 8], [3, 8, 5, 3], [2, 2, 10, 6], [8, 2, 4, 0], [7, 7, 8, 6], [9, 3, 9, 1], [2, 9, 0, 1], [3, 7, 8, 1], [3, 9, 10, 1], [6, 0, 5, 4], [2, 3, 5, 9], [8, 6, 3, 3], [9, 10, 3, 0], [6, 3, 2, 6], [1, 5, 9, 0], [7, 7, 1, 7], [2, 8, 2, 9], [2, 10, 8, 8], [1, 8, 3, 9], [7, 2, 9, 8]]

The final matrix:

>>> matrix
array([[  5.,   1.,   1.,   8.],
       [  3.,   8.,   5.,   3.],
       [  2.,   2.,  10.,   6.],
       [  8.,   2.,   4.,   0.],
       [  7.,   7.,   8.,   6.],
       [  9.,   3.,   9.,   1.],
       [  2.,   9.,   0.,   1.],
       [  3.,   7.,   8.,   1.],
       [  3.,   9.,  10.,   1.],
       [  6.,   0.,   5.,   4.],
       [  2.,   3.,   5.,   9.],
       [  8.,   6.,   3.,   3.],
       [  9.,  10.,   3.,   0.],
       [  6.,   3.,   2.,   6.],
       [  1.,   5.,   9.,   0.],
       [  7.,   7.,   1.,   7.],
       [  2.,   8.,   2.,   9.],
       [  2.,  10.,   8.,   8.],
       [  1.,   8.,   3.,   9.],
       [  7.,   2.,   9.,   8.]])

and if you want the rows of test_data to become the columns of matrix you can just transpose, i.e. matrix = matrix.T

gives:

>>> matrix.T
array([[  5.,   3.,   2.,   8.,   7.,   9.,   2.,   3.,   3.,   6.,   2.,
          8.,   9.,   6.,   1.,   7.,   2.,   2.,   1.,   7.],
       [  1.,   8.,   2.,   2.,   7.,   3.,   9.,   7.,   9.,   0.,   3.,
          6.,  10.,   3.,   5.,   7.,   8.,  10.,   8.,   2.],
       [  1.,   5.,  10.,   4.,   8.,   9.,   0.,   8.,  10.,   5.,   5.,
          3.,   3.,   2.,   9.,   1.,   2.,   8.,   3.,   9.],
       [  8.,   3.,   6.,   0.,   6.,   1.,   1.,   1.,   1.,   4.,   9.,
          3.,   0.,   6.,   0.,   7.,   9.,   8.,   9.,   8.]])

`

share|improve this answer
    
if you took that approach then make sure you're looping over test, i.e. dat is actually changing. Can you post an example matrix? But if you're trying to assign the entire list ytest to matrix[k], matrix[k] = ytest is really the way to go. – seth Jul 16 '13 at 14:40
1  
omg, I edited, you edited.. now I`m confused. Let me read it again lol – user Jul 16 '13 at 14:49
    
Yes, thanks.. that`s exactly what I wanted! :)) – user Jul 16 '13 at 15:42

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