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I have a Generic class I want to extend externally.

If I were within the class of MyGenericClass<T>, I could simply define a method like

public MyReturnType MyMethod() 
{ 
    MyReturnType m; 
    //some code
    return m;
}

Which can then be called by an instance, as usual, with myGenericClass.MyMethod();

However, I want to add this function externally using extensions.

The following does not compile:

public static MyReturnType MyMethod(this MyGenericClass<T> mgc)
{
    MyReturnType m; 
    //some code
    return m;
}

because type T cannot be inferred.

The following does compile:

public static MyReturnType MyMethod<T>(this MyGenericClass<T> mgc)
{
    MyReturnType m; 
    //some code
    return m;
}

However, this requires that I type myGenericClass.MyMethod<MyT>(); and worse, there is no constraint on "T" in MyMethod to be the same as the "T" in MyGenericClass - the two generics are independent (and rely on the user using the same type for both class and function).

How do I declare this properly?

Thanks Haighstrom

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Yes the T is the same T, and if you want a clause, simply add 'where T : IComparable’ to the method signature. –  Rob van der Veer Jul 16 '13 at 14:52
    
It is the same T. Did you try testing it? If you make an object of MyGenericClass<int> - you cannot call MyMethod<string> on it - compilation error right there. –  Vivek Jul 16 '13 at 14:58
1  
myGenericClass will have to be concrete ex (MyGenericClass<Boolean>) so when you have an object of that the type T is already known. myGenericClass.MyMethod(); will be implied –  Nate-Wilkins Jul 16 '13 at 14:58
    
You're all right, and I was being an idiot. When I changed to it to 'Method<T>(this Class<T> c)' the static declaration got lost somehow so I thought it wasn't working. Thanks all. –  Haighstrom Jul 16 '13 at 15:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your last definition is the correct one. The fact that you use T in both the method declaration and the type parameter means that the type with be constrained to be the same in both cases (meaning you can't cross the types).

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You're totally right. Thanks. –  Haighstrom Jul 16 '13 at 15:29

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