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I need to perform a circular left shift of a 64-bit integer in JavaScript. However:

  • JavaScript numbers are doubles
  • JavaScript converts them to 32-bit signed ints when you start with the << and the >> and the >>> and the ~ and all of the bit-twiddling business. And then it's back to doubles when you're done. I think.
  • I don't want the sign. And I definitely don't want the decimal bits. But I definitely do want 64 bits.

So, how do I perform a bitwise left rotation of a 64-bit value?

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Do you know for sure that your Javascript will always be running on a 64-bit platform? –  Amber Nov 20 '09 at 2:50
    
p.s. Downvotes for anyone who tells me not to do this in JavaScript. Not helpful! And I know that this is not the sort of task that JavaScript is well suited for. But I need to do it anyway. KTHXBAI. –  Jeff Nov 20 '09 at 2:50
    
not that I believe you, but if JavaScript stores it in a double then it's a double not a 64bit int (regardless of sign). –  Simeon Pilgrim Nov 20 '09 at 2:51
    
Nope. It probably won't be, in fact. I'm thinking the solution will involve simulating the 64-bit value with a tuple or Array or something. –  Jeff Nov 20 '09 at 2:51
    
Sigh. This is why I used the word "simulate" in the question. I don't need JavaScript to store this as a single 64-bit int; I just need to do something that gives me the right answers when I say "circular left shift this value 35 places, and tell me what the resulting int value would be if we were playing with 64-bit ints." –  Jeff Nov 20 '09 at 2:56

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Keep your 64-bit number as separate high and low halves. To rotate left N when N < 32:

hi_rot = ((hi << N) | (lo >>> (32-N))) & (0xFFFFFFFF)

lo_rot = ((lo << N) | (hi >>> (32-N))) & (0xFFFFFFFF)

If N >= 32, then subtract 32 from N, swap hi and lo, and then do the above.

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I like this way of doing it, but will the fact that the numbers are signed cause any gotchas? The most significant bit stores the sign. –  Jeff Nov 20 '09 at 5:47
    
Oh, you said less than 32. Looks like that takes care of the problem. –  Jeff Nov 20 '09 at 5:55
1  
The only problem with this is that & (0xFFFFFFFF) is a no-op here. If you want to make the numbers unsigned, use >>> 0 instead. –  Jason Orendorff Nov 20 '09 at 6:22

I believe so, though not the most efficient way, convert the number to a string in binary form (64-bits), use substring to move the char at the beginning and append it to the end (for left rotation) and convert the binary form back to number. I am sure you can figure out how to convert a decimal number to its binary form into a string and back.

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I guess I am asking for a down vote? :-) –  Murali Nov 20 '09 at 3:02
    
+1: it's hacky solution to a really odd problem. –  Simeon Pilgrim Nov 20 '09 at 3:05
2  
Nah, it's a legit solution, even if it's not the kind of solution I'm hoping for. No downvotes for you. –  Jeff Nov 20 '09 at 3:08

The only way I think it can be done is to create an int64 class which internally contains two 32 bit integers and performs shifting by carrying between them.

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Here's a values based rotate.

double d = 12345678901.0;
// get high int bits in hi, and the low in
int hi = (int)(d / 16.0 / 16.0 / 16.0 / 16.0);
int low = (int)d;

int rot = 3; // thus * 8
int newhi = (low >> (32 - rot)) | (hi << rot);
int newlow = (hi >> (32 - rot)) | (low << rot);

double newdouble = ((double)hi * 16.0 * 16.0 * 16.0 * 16.0) + (double)low;
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Well that's a C# version, and because of the signed int's the last step does not actually work as expected. Infact it's most likely will also not work for negative doubles ether... –  Simeon Pilgrim Nov 20 '09 at 3:24

As @Doug Currie put it you need to represent the 64-bit number as two numbers, then do bit-wise operations on them. The code I've used is:

//Constructor for a Long..
function Long(high, low) {
    //note: doing "or 0", truncates to 32 bit signed
    //big-endian 2's complement int..
    this._high = high | 0;
    this._low = low | 0;
}
Long.prototype.rotateLeft = function(bits) {
    var newHigh;
     if(bits === 32){ //just switch high and low over in this case..
        newHigh = this._low;
        this._low = this._high;
        this._high = newHigh;
    } else {
        newHigh = (this._high << bits) | (this._low >>> (32-bits)); 
        this._low = (this._low << bits) | (this._high >>> (32-bits));
        this._high = newHigh;
    }
    return this; //for chaining..
};
//Rotates the bits of this word round to the right (max 32)..
Long.prototype.rotateRight = function(bits) {
    var newHigh;
    if(bits === 32){ //just switch high and low over in this case..
        newHigh = this._low;
        this._low = this._high;
        this._high = newHigh;
    } else {
        newHigh = (this._low << (32-bits)) | (this._high >>> bits); 
        this._low = (this._high << (32-bits)) | (this._low >>> bits);
        this._high = newHigh;
    }
    return this; //for chaining..
};

To use it try running: console.log(new Long(0,1).rotateLeft(4)); then inspecting the _high and _low properties.

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I would try this:

function rotate(hi,lo,n) {
    var N = n/%32;
    if(Math.floor(n/32)%2) {
        var hi_rot = ((hi << N) | (lo >>> (32-N))) & (~0);
        var lo_rot = ((lo << N) | (hi >>> (32-N))) & (~0);
    } else {
        var hi_rot = ((lo << N) | (hi >>> (32-N))) & (~0);
        var lo_rot = ((hi << N) | (lo >>> (32-N))) & (~0);
    }
    return (hi_rot<<32)+lo_rot;
}
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