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Lets say I have a few sensors. Most sensors provide 3 values like a Accelerometer.

public class GenericSensor {
    double x, y, z;
}

public class Accelerometer extends GenericSensor {
    double roll, pitch;
}

Every sensor is a bit different. Thats why some need a calibration and the others not.

I can't find nice way to calibrate the values and keep the raw values for other purposes.

It should be easily expandable to other sensor types like a Gyrometer or Magnetometer if I need them later.

My first attempt was to decorate the calibration. If the all sensors extend the GenericSensor like the Accelerometer, I could use CalibratedGenericSensor( GenericSensor s ). But accessing the Acceleromter for its calculated member values is troublesome if I only provide the CalibratedGenericSensor object to other methods.

Thats why I think the calibration should happen much earlier like this.

public class GenericSensor {
    double x, y, z;
}

public class CalibratedGenericSensor extends GenericSensor {
    double calX, calY, calZ

    @Override
    double getX() { return calX; }

    @Override
    void setX( double x ){ super.setX(x); calX = calibrate(x); }

    double getRawX() { return super.getX(); }
}

public class Accelerometer extends CalibratedGenericSensor {
    double pitch, roll;
}

What are your thoughts about it? Or does a design pattern exist for things like this that I'm missing?

Thanks in advance for your time.

share|improve this question

How are the classes going to be used? Try to first write the code that will call the class, and then you will know what the API need to be.

For example, maybe a GenericSensor needs a showCalibrationView method that allows the user to calibrate it.

share|improve this answer
    
"Try to first write the code that will call the class, and then you will know what the API need to be." Done right that. Seems not really optimal but it works. (Can't +1 because of insufficient rep) – Qner Aug 9 '13 at 13:03

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