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Okay, I have written a basic function in oracle to return the current worker based on the client id and the date specified.

It works as intended.

FUNCTION get_worker_new_test  (p_id IN VARCHAR2, p_date IN DATE, w_type IN
VARCHAR2)     RETURN VARCHAR2 IS

CURSOR c1 IS

 SELECT 
 O_RELATIONSHIPS.ID

 FROM o_relationships
 WHERE rel_source_per_gro_id = p_id
 AND rel_rty_code in (w_type)
 AND p_date BETWEEN rel_start_date AND NVL(rel_end_date, SYSDATE)
 ORDER BY rel_start_date DESC;


 l_name VARCHAR2(70) ;

BEGIN
OPEN c1;
FETCH c1 INTO l_name;
CLOSE c1;

RETURN l_name;

END;

So for example, a query like this:

SELECT
CLIENT,
get_worker_new_test(CLIENT,sysdate,'WORKER')
FROM TABLE

Would return something like:

Client1 | A WORKER

However, I was wondering if it was possible to ask the function to return the latest worker from a number of different worker types.

So for example, I'd write the query like this:

SELECT
CLIENT,
get_worker_new_test(CLIENT,sysdate,'WORKER,CLERK,MANAGER')
FROM TABLE

And it would return:

Client1 | A MANAGER

if the latest worker type assigned was a manager. I think I need a function that will split the string into seperate entries, but even then I'm not sure if there's a better way of going about it. Any advice or guidance would be appreciated.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Why the need for a function at all? Why not just join when you need to join? Not a big fan of functions that simply hide SQL queries. One problem is what you're facing, you constantly need to consider the growing possibilities of user predicates and stick in your function. I won't touch the performance issues –  tbone Jul 16 '13 at 15:18
    
I usually do use joins, but I'm finding this is information I am constantly having to use in my reports. The function is for myself and one other colleague, users wouldn't have access to them. - If you have other suggestions other than a function then I'm happy to hear them, but probably 90% of the reports I write usually have to have some type of worker information in them (worker, review worker, co worker, etc). –  bawpie Jul 16 '13 at 15:30
    
Dynamic SQL –  GriffeyDog Jul 16 '13 at 15:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Quick and dirty solution #1. Use next query in your function:

SELECT 
O_RELATIONSHIPS.ID

FROM o_relationships
WHERE rel_source_per_gro_id = p_id
AND instr( ','||w_type||',', ','||rel_rty_code||',' ) <> 0 --<-- Check comma-quoted worker type to be substring of parameter string
AND p_date BETWEEN rel_start_date AND NVL(rel_end_date, SYSDATE)
ORDER BY rel_start_date DESC;

Quick and dirty solution #2. Create SQL-type:

create type uservchartab as table of varchar2(4000);

Replace your function with this code:

FUNCTION get_worker_new_test  
  (p_id IN VARCHAR2, p_date IN DATE, w_type IN uservchartab)
  RETURN VARCHAR2 
IS

  CURSOR c1 IS
     SELECT O_RELATIONSHIPS.ID
       FROM o_relationships
      WHERE rel_source_per_gro_id = p_id
        AND rel_rty_code member of w_type --<-- Check worker type to be one from the condition
        AND p_date BETWEEN rel_start_date AND NVL(rel_end_date, SYSDATE)
      ORDER BY rel_start_date DESC;

  l_name VARCHAR2(70) ;

BEGIN
  OPEN c1;
  FETCH c1 INTO l_name;
  CLOSE c1;

  RETURN l_name;
END;

Use it like this:

SELECT CLIENT
     , get_worker_new_test( CLIENT, sysdate, uservchartab( 'WORKER', 'CLERK', 'MANAGER' ) )
  FROM TABLE
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this, I went for QaD solution #2, and it's doing what I need it to. Thanks. –  bawpie Jul 17 '13 at 8:47

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