Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I just like to test a bug about select listen more than 1024 files descriptor on Linux(Ubuntu 13.04/Debian 6). And I override FD_SETSIZE and __FD_SETSIZE macros.

And then , perror() report have some errors while closing files descriptor at the end of program. On my PC like the following :(the quantity of errors depends on the quantity of listens).

closing file at 0
close: Bad file descriptor
closing file at 1
close: Bad file descriptor
closing file at 2
close: Bad file descriptor
closing file at 3
close: Bad file descriptor
closing file at 4
close: Bad file descriptor
closing file at 5
close: Bad file descriptor
closing file at 6
close: Bad file descriptor
closing file at 7
close: Bad file descriptor

the Code is following :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <sys/resource.h>

#define __FD_SETSIZE 8192
#define FD_SETSIZE 8192

#define NR_SELECT 2048 

char filename[10];

void init()
{
    struct rlimit* rlim;
    int n;
    rlim = (struct rlimit*)malloc(sizeof(struct rlimit));
    n=getrlimit(RLIMIT_NOFILE,rlim);
    if (n == -1) {
        perror("getrlimit");
        exit(1);
    }
    rlim->rlim_max=8192;
    rlim->rlim_cur=8192;

    n=setrlimit(RLIMIT_NOFILE,rlim);
    if (n == -1) {
        perror("setrlimit");
        exit(1);
    }

}

int main(void)
{
    int fd[4096];
    int i;
    fd_set fdset;
    struct timeval tv;
    int retval;

    init();

    /*clear and init a fd set*/
    FD_ZERO(&fdset);

    for (i=0;i<NR_SELECT;i++) {
        sprintf(filename,"./tst%d",i);
        fd[i]=open(filename,O_CREAT|O_RDWR,0666);
        if (fd[i] == -1) {
            fprintf(stderr,"opening at %dfile \n",i);
            perror("open while opening at \n");
            exit(1);
        }
    }
    for (i=0;i<NR_SELECT;i++) {
        FD_SET(fd[i],&fdset);
        if (!FD_ISSET(fd[i],&fdset)) {
            fprintf(stderr,"checking fd[%d] in fdset",i);
            perror("FD_ISSET");
            exit(1);
        }
    }

    tv.tv_sec=5;
    tv.tv_usec=0;

    retval = select(4096,&fdset,NULL,NULL,&tv);
    if (retval == -1)
        perror("select()");
    else if (retval) {
        printf("data available\n");
    }

    for (i=0;i<NR_SELECT;i++) {
        int n;
        n = close(fd[i]);
        if (n== -1) {
            fprintf(stderr,"closing file at %d\n",i);
            perror("close");
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

While compiling will some warning about redefine Marcos.

share|improve this question
1  
Ugh, select. Have you considered using poll or epoll? –  James McLaughlin Jul 16 '13 at 15:21
    
Try moving your #defines up to before your #include statements -- they can't affect the headers if they are parsed after the headers have already been pulled in. –  Jeremy Friesner Jul 16 '13 at 15:36
add comment

1 Answer

You need to define FD_SETSIZE before including whatever header that on your system happens to pull in sys/select.h. Otherwise that header will define it and your redefinition will either do nothing or break the FD_* macros.

Also. Don't use select. Use poll, epoll, kqueue or any other modern interface that's designed to better deal with more than 20 file descriptors.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you sir. But Now I'd like to verify select(). –  Jinnan Jul 16 '13 at 22:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.