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I have an NSArray, and I want to split it into two equal pieces (if odd "count" then add to the latter new array) - I want to split it "down the middle" so to speak.

The following code does exactly what I want, but is there a better way?:

// NOTE: `NSArray testableArray` is an NSArray of objects from a class defined elsewhere;
NSMutableArray *leftArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];  
NSMutableArray *rightArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

for (int i=0; i < [testableArray count]; i=i+1) {
if (i < [testableArray count]/2) {
        [leftArray addObject:[testableArray objectAtIndex:i]];
	}
	else {
		[rightArray addObject:[testableArray objectAtIndex:i]];
	}
}

Once leftArray and rightArray are made, I will not change them, so they do not need to be "mutable". I think there may be a way to accomplish the above code with the ObjectsAtIndexes method or some fast enumeration method?, but I cannot get the following code to work (or other variations):

NSArray *leftArray = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:[testableArray objectsAtIndexes:[NSIndexSet indexSetWithIndexesInRange:NSMakeRange(????, ????)]]];
NSArray *rightArray = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:[testableArray objectsAtIndexes:[NSIndexSet indexSetWithIndexesInRange:NSMakeRange(????, ????)]]];

Does anyone know if I am going in the right direction with this or point me in the correct direction?

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 32 down vote accepted

You also have the option of using -subarrayWithRange: detailed in the NSArray documentation:

NSArray *firstHalfOfArray;
NSArray *secondHalfOfArray;
NSRange someRange;

someRange.location = 0;
someRange.length = [wholeArray count] / 2;

firstHalfOfArray = [wholeArray subarrayWithRange:someRange];

someRange.location = someRange.length;
someRange.length = [wholeArray count] - someRange.length;

secondHalfOfArray = [wholeArray subarrayWithRange:someRange];

This method returns new, autorelease-d arrays.

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Alex, thanks for your ultra-quick response(s)! Your second solution is much better. I think I got too hung up implementing NSRange, which you also laid out very clearly in the above example! –  J. Dave Nov 20 '09 at 3:30
1  
there is a bug here. There is no need to +1. Example: an array of 6 elements. the first NSRange should be {0, 3} the second NSRange should be {3, 3}. In your case you'll get an exception because the second range would be out of bounds {4, 3}. –  Stas Zhukovskiy Oct 9 '13 at 19:03
    
Thanks, Stas. I fixed this code. –  Alex Reynolds Oct 10 '13 at 0:10
    
You can do this with less lines using NSMakeRange, for example: NSArray* firstHalf = [wholeArray subarrayWithRange:NSMakeRange(0, [wholeArray count]/2)]; NSArray* secondHalf = [wholeArray subarrayWithRange:NSMakeRange([wholeArray count]/2, [wholeArray count] - [wholeArray count]/2)]; –  DFectuoso Aug 31 '14 at 5:28

Have you tried adding nil to the end of the -initWithObjects: method?

NSArray *leftArray = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:[testableArray objectsAtIndexes:[NSIndexSet indexSetWithIndexesInRange:NSMakeRange(????, ????)]], nil];
NSArray *rightArray = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:[testableArray objectsAtIndexes:[NSIndexSet indexSetWithIndexesInRange:NSMakeRange(????, ????)]], nil];
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Thanks, such a quick response! I tried the above code, but I get an error related to my class, so I think I am specifying NSRange incorrectly. –  J. Dave Nov 20 '09 at 3:31

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