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I have two derived classes (Sale and ServiceCharge). Both are Transactions. If I have a BusinessService, I want to create a ServiceCharge for it. If I pass a Product, I want to instantiate Sale.

Here's my idea.

private void CreateInstance(object element)
{
    Transaction transaction;
    if (element.GetType() == typeof(BussinessService))
    {
        transaction = new ServiceCharge((BussinessService)element))
    }
    else
    {
        transaction = new Sale((Product)element);
    }
{

Could you tell me a more elegant way? I would know how to use generics with only a single constructor

private void CreateInstance<T>(T element)
{
   Transaction transaction = new Transaction((T)element);
}

But I don't know how to work out with the first case.

share|improve this question
    
element should be polymorphic. Because element is poorly named I can't offer a code based fix. –  P.Brian.Mackey Jul 16 '13 at 15:55
    
are BuisinessService and Product polymorphic in some way? Do they implement a common interface or share a common ancestor? –  Jodrell Jul 16 '13 at 16:08
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow! I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Jul 16 '13 at 16:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just a plain interface would also work in this case:

interface ITransactionable
{
    Transaction CreateTransaction();
}

class BusinessService : ITransactionable
{
    public Transaction CreateTransaction() { return new ServiceCharge( this ); }
}

class Product : ITransactionable
{
    public Transaction CreateTransaction() { return new Sale( this ); }
}

private void CreateInstance(ITransactionable element)
{
   Transaction transaction = element.CreateTransaction();
   ...
}   
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yep, that's true. There's nothing in the code OP showed which needs it to be generic. This is a bit simpler, but interface names in .NET should start with an I. –  p.s.w.g Jul 16 '13 at 16:03
    
I agree. I think the generics makes it more complicated without adding any value. –  Buh Buh Jul 16 '13 at 16:05
    
I was tempted to suggest this as an answer but generics can give you a specialised return type which could be beneficial. –  Jodrell Jul 17 '13 at 8:16
1  
That's true, but also not specifically needed here. The reason I went for the simple polymorphic solution was based on the idea that simpler is better if it achieves what's required! :) –  SteveL Jul 17 '13 at 8:35
    
Thanks a lot! I think I need to train my poor OOP abilities. This solution is giving me a lot of new ideas :) –  Kaikus Jul 17 '13 at 11:28

Define a generic interface like this:

public interface ITransactionable<T>
    where T : Transaction
{
    T CreateTransaction();
}

And decorate your BussinessService and Product as:

public class BussinessService :
    ITransactionable<ServiceCharge>
{
    public T CreateTransaction() 
    { 
        return new ServiceCharge(this);
    }
}

public class Product :
    ITransactionable<Sale>
{
    public T CreateTransaction() 
    { 
        return new Sale(this);
    }
}

Now your generic method can be defined as:

private void CreateInstance<T>(ITransactionable<T> element)
{
   Transaction transaction = element.CreateTransaction();
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
one critisicm, its not covariant. Otherwise we've arrived at the same answer. Although I prefer my semantics I can't read the OP's mind. –  Jodrell Jul 16 '13 at 16:50
    
if the interface is not covariant, you'll have trouble making an IEnumerable<ITransactionable<Transaction>> which would obviously be useful for set based operation or any polymorphic linq activity. –  Jodrell Jul 16 '13 at 16:54

Just create two different methods:

private void CreateInstance(Product product)
{
    Transaction transaction = new Sale(product);
}
private void CreateInstance(BusinessService service)
{
    Transaction transaction = new ServiceCharge(service);
}

The compiler will know what method you called depending on the type of the parameter you use.

share|improve this answer

BusinessService and Product should be polymorphic in some way, probably by sharing a interface, somthing like

interface IChargable<out T> where T : Transaction
{
    Transaction Charge();
}

The interface implemented thus,

class BusinessService : IChargable<ServiceCharge>
{
    public ServiceCharge Charge()
    {
        return new ServiceCharge(...
    }
}

class Product : IChargable<Sale>
{
    public Sale Charge()
    {
        return new Sale(...
    }
}

which means some code like this would work

var chargables = new IChargable<Transaction>[]
    {
        new BusinessService(),
        new Product()
    };

var transactions = chargables.Select(c => c.Charge());    
share|improve this answer
    
+1 The covariance is a nice touch. –  p.s.w.g Jul 16 '13 at 16:54
    
In order for that to work, the declared return type of IChargable<T>.Charge should be T instead of Transaction. –  Jean Hominal Jul 17 '13 at 7:51
    
@JeanHominal, but there is no T type. T is contstrained to be polymorphic with Transaction. The code does work, because IChargable is covariant for T. –  Jodrell Jul 17 '13 at 8:06
    
@JeanHominal, You cannot declare a variable with the name of a type parameter unless it happens to be a valid type (unlikely for T and not in the question.) –  Jodrell Jul 17 '13 at 8:12
    
I know that there is no T type, because T is a type parameter, not a type. But still, you can use either types or type parameters for type declarations - whether of method parameter, field and property types, or method return types. Seriously, you can try and compile the gist I wrote, e.g. on the compileonline.com/compile_csharp_online.php website. Between @p.s.w.g and you, we have two halves of an optimal generic interface declaration - but he did not add covariance when he could, and you do not use the genericity. –  Jean Hominal Jul 17 '13 at 8:36

Why use generics? Isn't it what polymorphism is for? (Curious for my own understanding)

public interface ITransactionable
{
    Transaction CreateTransaction();
}

public class BussinessService : ITransactionable
{
    public Transaction CreateTransaction() 
    { 
        return new ServiceCharge();
    }
}

public class Product : ITransactionable
{
    public Transaction CreateTransaction() 
    { 
        return new Sale();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You probably have to add this inside Sale() and ServiceCharge(). –  pascalhein Jul 16 '13 at 16:38
1  
Please don't post a question as an answer. That should have been a comment. Also, your answer had already been posted by SteveL. –  Buh Buh Jul 16 '13 at 16:47
    
True... weird that I missed it –  New Dev Jul 16 '13 at 17:02

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