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In searching for my answer I came across this:

removing a space from a string by awk

but I was unsuccessful in extrapolating the information here to my situation.

I currently have some data formatted like this:

Host Name="Host Name Here"
Product Name="Product Name Here"
Program Name="Program Name Here"

I simply want to remove the spaces in the first field, so the result will look like this:

HostName="Host Name Here"
ProductName="Product Name Here"
ProgramName="Program Name Here"

Using this code resulted in removing all spaces from all fields:

awk 'BEGIN {FS=" "; OFS=""} {for(i=1;i<=NF;++i) {out = out OFS $i}} END {print out;}'

Which, to my understanding, is just looking for spaces as a field separator and printing out, with spaces replaced by empty strings, which isn't quite what I want.

I believe I need to use awk, and I'll have to set the Field Separator to =, and then apply something like this, maybe??

awk '$1 ~ /[ \t]/ {gsub(/[ \t]/,"",$1)1}

Which, to my very limited understanding, will look at field 1, and if it contains the pattern [ \t], will use gsub to replace that space with an empty string. I don't think I have the syntax entirely correct here, though.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use = as the field separator (for both input and output) and remove blanks from the first field:

awk -F= -v OFS="=" '{gsub(/[[:blank:]]/, "", $1); print}' << END
Host Name="Host Name Here"
Product Name="Product Name Here"
The Program Name="Program Name Here"
END
HostName="Host Name Here"
ProductName="Product Name Here"
TheProgramName="Program Name Here"
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This is exactly where my attempt was trying to get to. Glad to know I was pretty close, at least. –  dsclough Jul 16 '13 at 16:26

The simplest way to this if you only have single spaces would be with sed:

$ sed 's/ //' file
HostName="Host Name Here"
ProductName="Product Name Here"
ProgramName="Program Name Here"

With GNU sed you can use the -i option to store the changes back to the file:

$ sed -i 's/ //' file

If it may be the case that you may have more than two words separated by a space before the = you could do the following with awk:

$ awk '{sub(/ /,"",$1)}1' FS="=" OFS="=" file
HostName="Host Name Here"
ProductName="Product Name Here"
ProgramName="Program Name Here"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This works. I don't understand why this sed command isn't going through the whole line and replacing all the spaces though. –  dsclough Jul 16 '13 at 16:17
    
This will fail for a first field with several spaces. And it will be difficutl for sed to fix it. –  Birei Jul 16 '13 at 16:17
    
On further inspection, Birei is right. I've also noticed weird behavior for the very first line it executes on... –  dsclough Jul 16 '13 at 16:21
    
@Birei good point, didn't think of that, doesn't seem to be the case but added a solution any how. @dsclough that is sed default behaviour to remove all occurences you would use the g flag (global). –  iiSeymour Jul 16 '13 at 16:21
    
@sudo_O: Yes. I will you a +1 for the fast awk fix. I thought in it at first sight. It seems much more natural and appropiate in this case. –  Birei Jul 16 '13 at 16:29

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