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I'm wondering if there is a simpler, memory efficient way to select a subset of rows and columns from a pandas DataFrame.

For instance, given this dataframe:

df = DataFrame(np.random.rand(4,5), columns = list('abcde'))
print df

          a         b         c         d         e
0  0.945686  0.000710  0.909158  0.892892  0.326670
1  0.919359  0.667057  0.462478  0.008204  0.473096
2  0.976163  0.621712  0.208423  0.980471  0.048334
3  0.459039  0.788318  0.309892  0.100539  0.753992

I want only those rows in which the value for column 'c' is greater than 0.5, but I only need columns 'b' and 'e' for those rows.

This is the method that I've come up with - perhaps there is a better "pandas" way?

locs = [df.columns.get_loc(_) for _ in ['a', 'd']]
print df[df.c > 0.5][locs]

          a         d
0  0.945686  0.892892

My final goal is to convert the result to a numpy array to pass into an sklearn regression algorithm, so I will use the code above like this:

training_set = array(df[df.c > 0.5][locs])

... and that peeves me since I end up with a huge array copy in memory. Perhaps there's a better way for that too?

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3 Answers 3

Use its value directly:

In [79]: df[df.c > 0.5][['b', 'e']].values
Out[79]: 
array([[ 0.98836259,  0.82403141],
       [ 0.337358  ,  0.02054435],
       [ 0.29271728,  0.37813099],
       [ 0.70033513,  0.69919695]])
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I didn't know about the .values attribute. Very nice! Also, slightly cleaner since you eliminated the single quotes & brackets and instead used df.c directly. –  John Prior Jul 16 '13 at 17:12
    
nice but how is it different from as_matrix though? –  dashesy Sep 30 at 20:48

Perhaps something like this for the first problem, you can simply access the columns by their names:

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(4,5), columns = list('abcde'))
>>> df[df['c']>.5][['b','e']]
          b         e
1  0.071146  0.132145
2  0.495152  0.420219

For the second problem:

>>> df[df['c']>.5][['b','e']].values
array([[ 0.07114556,  0.13214495],
       [ 0.49515157,  0.42021946]])
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1  
I didn't know about the .values attribute. Very nice! –  John Prior Jul 16 '13 at 17:10

.loc accept row and column selectors simultaneously (as do .ix/.iloc FYI) This is done in a single pass as well.

In [1]: df = DataFrame(np.random.rand(4,5), columns = list('abcde'))

In [2]: df
Out[2]: 
          a         b         c         d         e
0  0.669701  0.780497  0.955690  0.451573  0.232194
1  0.952762  0.585579  0.890801  0.643251  0.556220
2  0.900713  0.790938  0.952628  0.505775  0.582365
3  0.994205  0.330560  0.286694  0.125061  0.575153

In [5]: df.loc[df['c']>0.5,['a','d']]
Out[5]: 
          a         d
0  0.669701  0.451573
1  0.952762  0.643251
2  0.900713  0.505775

And if you want the values (though this should pass directly to sklearn as is); frames support the array interface

In [6]: df.loc[df['c']>0.5,['a','d']].values
Out[6]: 
array([[ 0.66970138,  0.45157274],
       [ 0.95276167,  0.64325143],
       [ 0.90071271,  0.50577509]])
share|improve this answer
    
Most elegant. What's the difference between .ix and .loc? –  John Prior Jul 16 '13 at 17:13
    
loc will not attempt to use a number (eg 1) as a positional argument at all (and will raise instead); see main pandas docs / selecting data –  Jeff Jul 16 '13 at 17:29
    
Thank you, Jeff –  John Prior Jul 16 '13 at 18:42

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