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I would like to learn a declarative approach for a data constraint issue I have had from time to time related to exclusive date ranges.

Below is a simplified example. I have items and prices on those items. I want the effective date range of the prices to be mutually exclusive with no overlap.

As I understand things with Oracle, user-defined functions are not eligible for use in CONSTRAINT declarations - and I can't even imagine how poorly it would perform if it were allowed. So I require a procedural approach using triggers. Typical trigger source is also included below.

I am not interested in learning better procedural logic for use within the trigger (it is just a simple demonstrative example). I am interested in learning a more declarative solution to a relatively popular data constraint issue I (and likely others) face.

I want to eliminate trigger-based solutions whenever I can, as a practice. However I can't seem to find my way out of this requirement without a trigger.

create table item ( title varchar2(32) primary key );
create table price ( 
   item           varchar2(32) not null references item (title), 
   price          number(9,2), 
   effective_from date not null, 
   effective_to   date not null, 
   constraint price_from_to_ck check (effective_to > effective_from ));

[REDACTED]
*(A combination of row and statement level triggers inteneded to prevent logical chronological overlap)

insert into item values ('LETTUCE');
insert into item values ('WHISKY');

insert into price values ( 'LETTUCE', 1.05, date '2013-01-01', date '2013-03-31' );
insert into price values ( 'LETTUCE', 1.08, date '2013-04-01', date '2013-06-30' ); 
insert into price values ( 'WHISKY', 33.99, date '2013-01-01', date '2013-05-31' );
insert into price values ( 'WHISKY', 31.15, date '2013-06-01', date '2013-07-31' ); 

-- should fail
insert into price values ( 'WHISKY', 30.55, date '2013-05-15', date '2013-06-05' ); 
share|improve this question
2  
It is difficult to correctly enforce this kind of "non-overlapping" constraint using triggers. You need some form of locking because you can't "see" changes that other sessions are making, and they might conflict with yours. See here and here for some discussion. Other approaches to consider might be: a) store only the "from" date and assume that each row is valid until the next "from" date, or, b) use a materialized view. –  Brian Camire Jul 16 '13 at 17:29
    
@BrianCamire The first link to AskTom is a procedural solution. And, I guess I don't see yours or the Jeff Kemp article's point that this is a multi-user concurrency issue at heart. This has the same aspects of concurrency as a not null constraint. I am concerned only that a single transaction does not violate the constraint. –  Clever Idea Widgetry Jul 16 '13 at 18:17
1  
I disagree. A procedure solution is an option (although you still need locking), but the AskTom link discusses mostly trigger-based approaches. Concurrency is more of an issue than a not null constraint, because: a) a not null constrant can be enforced declaratively, and, b) a not null constraint applies only to one row at a time. To illustrate the concurreny issue, the solution you posted will not prevent two concurrent transactions from inserting identical (and therefore overlapping) rows at the same time. –  Brian Camire Jul 16 '13 at 18:26
    
Two rows cannot be inserted at the same time. And the example I have in the question (presuming a typical READ COMMITTED transaction) would not allow the second insert. But yes, it is different than a not null constraint. What I want in the end is behavior on such a constraint that is very much handled like a not null constraint. –  Clever Idea Widgetry Jul 16 '13 at 18:35
1  
The solution you posted would allow a concurrent insert of overlapping rows. Try this in two SQL*Plus sessions, say named A and B: a) in Session A, insert a row, b) in Session B, insert a row with overlapping values, c) in Session A, commit the transaction, and, d) in Session B, commit the transaction. You now have an overlap. –  Brian Camire Jul 16 '13 at 18:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

While waiting for next Oracle 12c version, which supports Temporal Validity, I still use next approach:

create table item ( title varchar2(32) primary key );
create table price ( 
   price_id          number primary key,
   item              varchar2(32) not null references item (title), 
   price             number(9,2), 
   effective_from    date not null, 
   effective_to      date not null, 
   effective_prev_to date,
   constraint price_from_to_ck check ( effective_to > effective_from ),
   constraint price_to_prev_ck check ( effective_from = effective_prev_to + 1 ),
   constraint price_from_uq unique ( item, effective_to ),
   constraint price_dates_chain_fk foreign key ( item, effective_prev_to ) references price ( item, effective_to ) );

insert into item values ('LETTUCE');
insert into item values ('WHISKY');

insert into price values ( 1, 'LETTUCE', 1.05, date '2013-01-01', date '2013-03-31', null );
insert into price values ( 2, 'LETTUCE', 1.08, date '2013-04-01', date '2013-06-30', date '2013-03-31' ); 
insert into price values ( 3, 'WHISKY', 33.99, date '2013-01-01', date '2013-05-31', null );
insert into price values ( 4, 'WHISKY', 31.15, date '2013-06-01', date '2013-07-31', date '2013-05-31' ); 

Let's try:

insert into price values ( 5, 'WHISKY', 30.55, date '2013-05-15', date '2013-06-05', date '2013-05-14' ); 

ORA-02291: integrity constraint (USER_4_E7DF1.PRICE_DATES_CHAIN_FK) violated - parent key not found : insert into price values ( 'WHISKY', 30.55, date '2013-05-15', date '2013-06-05', date '2013-05-14' )

But now updating and deleting dates in the middle of the chain is pain in the ass. It needs to change preceding and following rows in one statement with MERGE. That's why I've added price_id column, because you can't update a key in MERGE -- so, you need another key instead of (item, effective_%).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the 12c link. I'm taking a look at that possibility. The 12c concept of a "PERIOD" is very much the direction I want to go. I think it is entirely possible I could piece together something similar. Let me tinker and post what I come up with (for those of us in 11g for the foreseeable future). –  Clever Idea Widgetry Jul 16 '13 at 18:20
    
My tinkering keeps leading me back to triggers. (sigh). This is far better a solution than a trigger in my opinion. And it isn't too cryptic. Also, wrapping a DAL around MERGE statements seems elegant enough. Thanks. –  Clever Idea Widgetry Jul 16 '13 at 18:48
    
Just FYI. Solution you provided in your question has two major lacks. First, it doesn't work in concurrent environment: one session see no changes that other sessions do until they commit it. Second, it doesn't work immediatly: when you already have a broken data you need to insert something to make trigger to fire. Third, it doesn't works at all: you forgot to eliminate a row from p in subquery to p2, so you can insert just one row into the price table, then it will join to itself in exists part. –  suPPLer Jul 16 '13 at 19:03
    
The trigger source was definitely concurrent failure (Brian finally got that through my thick skull) and actual code was not intended/tested as useful - just instructive on the general approach, so no worries. –  Clever Idea Widgetry Jul 16 '13 at 19:06
1  
@CleverIdeaWidgetry , please, note in your question that the code is just a sample and not a working solution. Save some newbie programmer's head. –  suPPLer Jul 16 '13 at 19:10

You can do this declaritively with a materialized view, as first suggested by Brian Camire. Here's an example:

--Original tables (with an extra primary key on PRICE)
create table item ( title varchar2(32) primary key );
create table price ( 
   id             number primary key,
   item           varchar2(32) not null references item (title), 
   price          number(9,2), 
   effective_from date not null, 
   effective_to   date not null, 
   constraint price_from_to_ck check (effective_to > effective_from ));

create materialized view log on price with rowid;

--Items with overlapping dates
create materialized view price_no_overlap_mv
refresh fast on commit as
select 'overlapping row' as dummy, price1.rowid rowid1, price2.rowid rowid2
from price price1, price price2
where
    --Same item
    price1.item = price2.item
    --Overlapping dates
    and (price1.effective_from <= price2.effective_to and price1.effective_to >= price2.effective_from) 
    --Don't compare the same row
    and price1.id <> price2.id
;

--Throw an error if any rows ever get created.
alter table price_no_overlap_mv
add constraint price_no_overlap_mv_ck check (dummy = 'no rows allowed');


insert into item values ('LETTUCE');
insert into item values ('WHISKY');

insert into price values (1, 'LETTUCE', 1.05, date '2013-01-01', date '2013-03-31' );
insert into price values (2, 'LETTUCE', 1.08, date '2013-04-01', date '2013-06-30' ); 
insert into price values (3, 'WHISKY', 33.99, date '2013-01-01', date '2013-05-31' );
insert into price values (4, 'WHISKY', 31.15, date '2013-06-01', date '2013-07-31' ); 
commit;

-- should fail
insert into price values (5, 'WHISKY', 30.55, date '2013-05-15', date '2013-06-05' ); 
commit;
ORA-12008: error in materialized view refresh path
ORA-02290: check constraint (JHELLER.PRICE_NO_OVERLAP_MV_CK) violated

This declarative approach is both concurrent and consistent. But there are a lot of draw backs:

  1. Materialized view logs, which are required for a fast refresh, are only supported in Enterprise Edition.
  2. Your table needs a primary key, although you probably already have one but just didn't include it in the example.
  3. Although declarative, the solution is still not straight-forward. You have to declare the opposite condition, and then check that it never exists.
  4. Getting FAST REFRESH to work can be a nightmare for more than the simplest of queries. Even for this simple example, I had to use the old-style joins and had to add useless ROWIDs.
  5. The constraint is not enforced until a COMMIT. Although that could be a positive thing, as many types of changes would temporarily create overlapping results. If you never allow overlapping results, you have to modify the table in a specific order.
share|improve this answer
    
This is an approach I have used in the past and it is not intuitive enough to maintain in the world I live in. –  Clever Idea Widgetry Jul 17 '13 at 23:44

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