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I want to make it so that a new object is non-extensible to the developer/user but still be able to add properties to itself via its own methods. I've tried a number of things and done a fair amount of reading but I seem unable to find any solution, perhaps there is none?

Here is an example of what I am trying/tried to do.

/*jslint maxerr: 50, indent: 4, browser: true, white: true, devel: true */

(function () {
    "use strict";

    function isValid(property) {
        if (typeof property === "number") {
            property = property.toString();
        }

        return typeof property === "string" && (/^\d{1,10}$/).test(property) && property >= 0 && property <= 4294967294;
    }

    function Foo() {}

    Object.defineProperties(Foo.prototype, {
        put: {
            value: function (number, value) {
                if (isValid(number)) {
                    Object.defineProperty(this, number, {
                        configurable: true,
                        enumerable: true,
                        value: value
                    });
                }
            }
        },

        clear: {
            value: function () {
                var property;

                for (property in this) {
                    if (this.hasOwnProperty(property) && isValid(property)) {
                        delete this[property];
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    });

    function newFoo(object, name) {
        return Object.defineProperty(object, name, {
            configurable: true,
            value: new Foo()
        });
    }

    var bar = {};

    newFoo(bar, "fee");

    /* All of the following prevent the condition below, but there seems
     * no way to undo them once done
     */
    //Object.preventExtensions(bar.fee)
    //Object.seal(bar.fee);
    //Object.freeze(bar.fee)

    bar.fee.clear();
    bar.fee.put(0, true);
    bar.fee.put(10, true);
    bar.fee.put(100, true);
    bar.fee.put(1000, true);
    //bar.fee[1000] = true; // prevent this, OK
    bar.fee[10000] = true; // prevent this, not OK

    console.log({
        0: bar,
        1: Object.keys(bar.fee)
    });
}());

On jsfiddle

Update: I was hoping to have the added properties (indexes) enumerable (like with array like objects) so that you can loop through them.

Further research: So I took the idea of not exposing the backing object: an Array, (as much as I could figure), and got the following results. Still not exactly what I was trying to achieve, and some surprise with those marked bad.

/*jslint maxerr: 50, indent: 4, browser: true, white: true, devel: true */

(function (undef) {
    "use strict";

    var noop = function () {},
        bar,
        fum,
        neArray;

    function isValid(property) {
        if (typeof property === "number") {
            property = property.toString();
        }

        return typeof property === "string" && (/^\d{1,10}$/).test(property) && property >= 0 && property <= 4294967294;
    }

    function Foo() {
        Object.defineProperty(this, "data", {
            value: Object.preventExtensions([]) // tried seal and freeze
        });
    }

    Object.defineProperties(Foo.prototype, {
        length: {
            get: function () {
                return this.data.length;
            },

            set: noop
        },

        put: {
            value: function (number, value) {
                this.data[number] = value;
            }
        },

        item: {
            value: function (number) {
                return isValid(number) ? this.data[number] : undef;
            }
        },

        keys: {
            get: function () {
                return Object.keys(this.data);
            },

            set: noop
        },

        clear: {
            value: function () {
                this.data.length = 0;
            }
        }
    });

    ["forEach", "some", "every", "map", "filter", "reduce", "slice", "splice", "push", "pop", "shift", "unshift", "indexOf", "lastIndexOf", "valueOf", "toString", "hasOwnProperty"].forEach(function (element) {
        Object.defineProperty(Foo.prototype, element, {
            value: function () {
                return this.data[element].apply(this.data, arguments);
            }
        });
    });

    function newFoo() {
        return Object.preventExtensions(Object.defineProperty({}, "fee", {
            value: new Foo()
        }).fee);
    }

    bar = newFoo();
    fum = newFoo();

    bar.clear();
    bar.put(0, true);
    bar.put(10, true);
    //bar.put(10000, true); // bad
    bar.valueOf()[100] = false; // not so great
    bar.data[1000] = false; // not so great
    //bar.put("xxx", false); // prevent this, OK
    //bar.data["xxx"] = false; // prevent this, OK
    //bar[1000] = false; // prevent this, OK
    //bar[10000] = false; // prevent this, OK

    console.log({
        0: bar,
        1: Object.keys(bar.data), // not so great
        2: bar.keys,
        3: fum,
        4: bar.hasOwnProperty(0),
        5: bar.valueOf(),
        6: bar.toString(),
        7: bar instanceof Foo,
        8: bar.item("forEach") // prevent this, OK
    });

    bar.forEach(function (element, index, object) {
        console.log("loop", element, index, object);
    });

    neArray = Object.preventExtensions([]);

    //neArray[10000] = true; // bad
}());

On jsfiddle

And more: Here is the extent of my research using an Object as a backing store, phew, jumping through hoops to get something as reasonable as the Array and some things better, some worse.

/*jslint maxerr: 50, indent: 4, browser: true, white: true, devel: true */

(function (undef) {
    "use strict";

    var noop = function () {},
    bar,
    fum,
    neObject;

    function isValid(property) {
        if (typeof property === "number") {
            property = property.toString();
        }

        return typeof property === "string" && (/^\d{1,10}$/).test(property) && property >= 0 && property <= 4294967294;
    }

    function Foo() {
        var data = {
            length: 0
        };

        Object.defineProperty(data, "length", {
            enumerable: false
        });

        Object.defineProperty(this, "data", { // can't prevent extension on object
            value: data
        });
    }

    Object.defineProperties(Foo.prototype, {
        valueOf: {
            value: function () {
                return [].slice.call(this.data);  //OK, disable for large numbers
            }
        },

        toString: {
            value: function () {
                return this.valueOf().toString();  //OK, disable for large numbers
            }
        },

        length: {
            get: function () {
                return this.data.length;
            },

            set: noop
        },

        put: {
            value: function (number, value) {
                if (isValid(number)) {
                    this.data[number] = value;
                    Object.defineProperty(this.data, "length", {
                        writable: true
                    });

                    var newLength = number + 1;
                    if (newLength > this.data.length) {
                        this.data.length = number + 1;
                    }

                    Object.defineProperty(this.data, "length", {
                        writable: false
                    });
                }
            }
        },

        item: {
            value: function (number) {
                return isValid(number) ? this.data[number] : undef;
            }
        },

        keys: {
            get: function () {
                var length = this.data.length;

                return Object.keys(this.data).filter(function (property) {
                    return isValid(property) && property <= length;
                }).map(function (property) {
                    return +property;
                }); // not so good, hack to filter bad
            },

            set: noop
        },

        clear: {
            value: function () {
                var property;

                for (property in this.data) {
                    if (this.data.hasOwnProperty(property) && this.data.propertyIsEnumerable(property)) {
                        delete this.data[property];
                    }
                }

                Object.defineProperty(this.data, "length", {
                    writable: true
                });

                this.data.length = 0;
                Object.defineProperty(this.data, "length", {
                    writable: false
                });
            }
        }
    });

    ["forEach", "some", "every", "map", "filter", "reduce", "slice", "splice", "push", "pop", "shift", "unshift", "indexOf", "lastIndexOf", "hasOwnProperty"].forEach(function (element) {
        Object.defineProperty(Foo.prototype, element, {
            value: function () {
                return [][element].apply(this.data, arguments);
            }
        });
    });

    function newFoo() {
        return Object.preventExtensions(Object.defineProperty({}, "fee", {
            value: new Foo()
        }).fee);
    }

    bar = newFoo();
    fum = newFoo();

    bar.clear();
    bar.put(0, true);
    bar.put(10, true);
    //bar.put(4294967294, true); // OK, disabled because of processing
    bar.put(4294967295, true);
    //bar.valueOf()[100] = false; // prevent this, OK
    bar.data[1000] = false; // bad
    //bar.put("xxx", false); // prevent this, OK
    bar.data.xxx = false; // not so good
    Object.defineProperty(bar.data, "yyy", {
        value: false
    });

    //bar[1000] = false; // prevent this, OK
    //bar[10000] = false; // prevent this, OK
    //bar.clear(); // OKish, won't clear something set as innumerable through bad

    console.log({
        0: bar,
        1: Object.keys(bar.data), // not so good // disable for large numbers
        2: bar.keys, // OKish with hack
        3: fum,
        4: bar.hasOwnProperty(0),
        5: bar.valueOf(),
        6: bar.toString(),
        7: bar instanceof Foo,
        8: bar.item("forEach") // prevent this, OK
    });

    bar.forEach(function (element, index, object) {
        console.log("loop", element, index, object);
    });

    neObject = Object.preventExtensions({});

    //neObject[10000] = true; // bad
}());

On jsfiddle

The only thing left to do is to move the prototypes inside their respective constructors so that the methods use a private variable for data as the backing object, which is what I believe @bfavaretto is suggesting, but then we loose the qualities of defining prototypes: increased memory and increased construction times due to creation of methods upon new

share|improve this question
1  
I don't think there is a way with Object.preventExtensions & friends. What you can do is not expose the object to the developers, only some methods to allow just what you want to allow. –  bfavaretto Jul 16 '13 at 17:36
    
you can make a shadow object that's left open while you offer a public frozen object with one tunnel property that can only be reached from inside the constructor, by closure (protected). if you don't use strict, you can also do referential overloading. –  dandavis Jul 16 '13 at 17:45
    
Thanks, I was hoping to have the added properties (indexes) numerable (like with array like objects) so that you can loop through them. I didn't make that clear in the question. Sorry. –  Xotic750 Jul 16 '13 at 17:48
    
@Xotic750: expandos are a bee-atch in ES5, you have to ODP each possible index, or upgrade an existing native object like String or Array. you can provide a protected shell to an internal array, so your internal methods can still use the indexes, but your external interface will still need parens to interact with. –  dandavis Jul 16 '13 at 17:58
    
Ouch, ODPing each index (~4294967295 ) doesn't seem viable. at least not with a loop, unless there is some other way? Out of String and Array, only String seems possibly viable due to its already inherent immutability, but whether it would actually be of any use is in practice is something I would have to investigate. –  Xotic750 Jul 16 '13 at 18:41

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