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I have

data = 
{
    'first': {
        'number': 1,
        'text': 'Ya.'
    },
    'second': {
        'number': 10,
        'text': 'Da.'
    }
};

And I really want to access it like:

number = data['first.number'];

Actually in a more flexible way, like:

numberOrText = data[memberName+'.'+propertyName];

Is there any lightweight library, or snippet you can suggest? This is - https://github.com/martinvl/KVCObject - so cool, but a bit overhead for this.

share|improve this question
1  
what is wrong with data[memberName][propertyName] ??? –  mohkhan Jul 16 '13 at 17:51
    
or data.memberName.propertyName? –  stefan Jul 16 '13 at 17:51
1  
if your path doesn't have non-wordy chars, you can eval the path. you can also use [].map() or a loop upon an exploded path to step a step deeper each time, setting branch to root and continuing... –  dandavis Jul 16 '13 at 17:53
    
@dandavis Some of that will be my solution, thanks. Eval sounds extremly simple solution. Can you post as an answer to accept? –  Geri Jul 17 '13 at 9:38
    
@mohkhan: I store references (array keyPaths) to controller objects on DOM elements dataset. Like data-key-path="viewController.controls.transform.opacitySlider"; Then have a reference to that object simply by get the value for the keyPath of document. –  Geri Jul 17 '13 at 10:19

4 Answers 4

I think You may like underscore-keypath.

var foo = {
  bar : {
    name : "Cool!"
  },
  scores : [55, 27, 100, 33]
};

_(foo).valueForKeyPath("bar.name");           // --> "Cool!"
_(foo).setValueForKeyPath("bar.name", "BAR"); // --> sets foo.bar.name as "BAR"
_(foo).valueForKeyPath("scores.@max");        // --> 100
share|improve this answer
    
I do like, nice lib. The syntax overhead is a bit too much for me. I prefer vanilla. –  Geri Feb 9 at 0:19

Make a helper function that reads a variable number of arguments or an array of parameters.

Object.prototype.$ = function() {
    var result = this;
    var list;
    /*
    Array .$(["first", "text"])
    String .$("second.number")
    String Parameters .$("first", "text")
    */
    if(arguments.length == 1 && Object.prototype.toString.call(arguments[0]) === "[object Array]")
        list = arguments[0];
    else if(arguments.length == 1 && typeof(arguments[0]) == 'string' && arguments[0].indexOf(".") >= 0)
        list = arguments[0].split(".");
    else
        list = arguments;
    for(var i=0; i<list.length; i++)
        result = result[list[i]];
    return result;
}

// test it
data = 
{
    'first': {
        'number': 1,
        'text': 'Ya.'
    },
    'second': {
        'number': 10,
        'text': 'Da.'
    }
};
var s = "second";
var s2 = "first.number";
console.log(data.$("first", "text"));
console.log(data.$(s, "number"));
console.log(data.$(["first", "number"]));
console.log(data.$(s2));

edit You could also make a helper function to DEnormalize your object, but only read values after you denormalize it because editing values will cause conflicts since your object will have copies of inner object values.

Example:

data["first"]["number"] == data["first.number"];
data["first.number"] = -1;
data["first"]["number"] != data["first.number"];

De-normalize code

function denormalize(obj, lv) {
    var more = false;
    for(var k in obj) {
        if(k.split(".").length == lv) {
            var node = obj[k]
            if(node && typeof(node) == 'object') {
                more = true;
                for(var k2 in node) {
                    obj[k + "." + k2] = node[k2];
                }
            }
        }
    }
    if(more)
        denormalize(obj, lv + 1);
    return obj;
}

// test it
data = 
{
    'first': {
        'number': 1,
        'text': 'Ya.'
    },
    'second': {
        'number': 10,
        'text': 'Da.'
    },
    "third": [{"number": 5, "text": "meh"},{"number": 6, "text": "beh"}]
};
denormalize(data, 1);
for(var k in data)
    console.log(k + " : " + data[k]);
share|improve this answer

if you have all dot-based paths (no array syntax), you can use eval or a simple sliding recursive function:

var data = {
    'first': {
        'number': 1,
        'text': 'Ya.'
    },
    'second': {
        'number': 10,
        'text': 'Da.'
    }
};


// the simple but discouraged way using eval:
alert(
  eval( 
     "data.second.text"
  )
); //shows "Da."


// a non-eval looping solution take s bit more code, but can be faster to execute:

function resolve(obj, path){
  var r=path.split(".");
  if(path){return resolve(obj[r.shift()], r.join("."));}
 return obj
}

alert(
   resolve(data, "first.text")
); //shows: "Ya."
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks for the non-eval suggestion, also the defineProperty. Now I got the ultimate solution, gonna post soon. –  Geri Feb 8 at 22:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Based on @dandavis pretty simple suggestions, I can set up accessors as prototype properties.

No eval, also leave Object.prototype untouched in terms of enumerating using Object.defineProperty.

The solution actually goes like this:

function stringContains(string, value)
{ return string.indexOf(value) != -1; }

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "setValueForKey", { value: function(value, key)
{ this[key] = value; }});

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "setValueForKeyPath", { value: function(value, keyPath)
{
    if (keyPath == null) return;
    if (stringContains(keyPath, '.') == false) { this.setValueForKey(value, keyPath); return; }

    var chain = keyPath.split('.');
    var firstKey = chain.shift();
    var shiftedKeyPath = chain.join('.');

    this[firstKey].setValueForKeyPath(value, shiftedKeyPath);
}});

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "getValueForKey", { value: function(key)
{ return this[key]; }});

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "getValueForKeyPath", { value: function(keyPath)
{
    if (keyPath == null) return;
    if (stringContains(keyPath, '.') == false) { return this.getValueForKey(keyPath); }

    var chain = keyPath.split('.');
    var firstKey = chain.shift();
    var shiftedKeyPath = chain.join('.');

    return this[firstKey].getValueForKeyPath(shiftedKeyPath);
}});

Test are fine:

data = {
    'name' : 'data',
    'first': {
        'number': 1,
        'text': 'Ya.',
        'meta' : {
            'lang' : 'en'
        }
    },
    'second': {
        'number': 10,
        'text': 'Ba.',
        'meta' : {
            'lang' : 'en'
        }
    },
    'third': {
        'number': 100,
        'text': 'Da.',
        'meta' : {
            'lang' : 'hu'
        }
    }
};

data.setValueForKey('chunk', 'name');
data.setValueForKeyPath('blob', 'name');

var thirdLanguage = data.getValueForKeyPath('third.meta.lang');
data.setValueForKeyPath(thirdLanguage, 'first.meta.lang');
data.setValueForKeyPath(thirdLanguage, 'second.meta.lang');

log(data);

Output is the same with hu as language in every data member.

share|improve this answer
1  
i would NOT modify Object.prototype if i were you. If i did, i would cover it up using Object.defineProperty() instead of leaving the for-loop-breaking prototype property assignment as it is in the code above... –  dandavis Jul 17 '13 at 15:46
    
Exactly, thanks for the suggestion. Will modify the answer as well soon. –  Geri Jul 19 '13 at 21:18
    
Modifided, now it is production safe. –  Geri Feb 8 at 23:49

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