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I have the following piece of code in a while loop where I calculate some probability with the exp() function. No matter what the input to the program on the 7th iteration of the loop the exp returns nan.

  if(new<=old){
     coloring[random_node]=random_color;
  }else{
     proba=exp((-(new-old))/temperature);
     /*assert(!isnan(proba));*/
     printf("proba == %.50f\n",proba);
     if(random_percent(proba)){
            coloring[random_node]=random_color;
     }
  }

The following is the debugging information of the 6th and 7th iteration inside the loop.

Breakpoint 1, graph_coloring_local_search (objectiveValue=50, N=50, E=350, edge_list=0x804d170, node_list=0x804dc68, maxIterations=100, 
initial_temperature=7) at coloring.c:391
391             proba=exp((-(new-old))/temperature);
(gdb) p new 
$21 = 1
(gdb) p old
$22 = 0
(gdb) p temperature 
$23 = 6.9992999999999999
(gdb) p -(new-old)/temperature 
$24 = -0.14287143000014288
(gdb) p ((double(*)())exp)(-(new-old)/temperature)
$25 = 0.8668655146301385
(gdb) c
Continuing.
proba == 0.86686551463013850060690401733154430985450744628906

Breakpoint 1, graph_coloring_local_search (objectiveValue=50, N=50, E=350, edge_list=0x804d170, node_list=0x804dc68, maxIterations=100, 
initial_temperature=7) at coloring.c:391
391             proba=exp((-(new-old))/temperature);
(gdb) p new 
$26 = 1
(gdb) p old
$27 = 0
(gdb) p temperature 
$28 = 6.9992999999999999
(gdb) p -(new-old)/temperature
$29 = -0.14287143000014288
(gdb) p ((double(*)())exp)(-(new-old)/temperature)
$30 = -nan(0x8000000000000)
(gdb) c
Continuing.
proba == -nan

In both cases the variables used have exactly the same value.

share|improve this question
3  
Do things change if you type p ((double(*)(double))exp)(-(new-old)/temperature) at the GDB prompt? If so, did you #include <math.h>? (I smell an implicit declaration.) –  Zack Jul 16 '13 at 19:35
    
Oh, and if that doesn't reveal the problem, try valgrind. This isn't obvious memory corruption but it might be subtle memory corruption. –  Zack Jul 16 '13 at 19:36
    
No nothing has changed and I include the math library –  rex123 Jul 16 '13 at 19:41
    
@Zack thanks for the advice with the implicit declaration. In the random_percent function I used a round macro which wasn't declared. –  rex123 Jul 16 '13 at 20:01
    
@Zack How should I go about with solving this question? –  rex123 Jul 16 '13 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

Zack's intuition was right. My random_percent function looks as follows and the round() macro wasn't declared.

int random_percent(double probability){ 
    int edge=round(100*probability); 
    return ((rand () % 100) < edge) ? 1 : 0;  
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is why you should disable implicit declarations. –  David Foerster Jul 16 '13 at 22:34

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