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I keep seeing lines of code with ^{ some code } in it... I thought that maybe it allowed to run a function inline similar to a lambda function. But I can not find any documentation on it. Could someone please enlighten me?

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marked as duplicate by Carl Norum, Matt S., Josh Caswell, vikingosegundo, Monolo Jul 16 '13 at 22:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Not trying to sound rude or anything... but if you google "objective c lambda function" you literally get what it is in the top 5 results –  Matt S. Jul 16 '13 at 19:58
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Of course knowing that it's called a "lambda" (or even a block) is 99% of the battle. –  nevan king Jul 16 '13 at 20:04
    
googling for Objective-C and lambda would have brought you possibly here: xs-labs.com/en/archives/articles/objc-blocks –  vikingosegundo Jul 16 '13 at 20:17
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When I saw the syntax was different for lambda then what I have been seeing I was not sure if they were the same... –  werdsackjon Jul 16 '13 at 20:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It is a block.

See the documentation.

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Tis a block!

http://developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/cocoa/Conceptual/Blocks/Articles/bxGettingStarted.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40007502-CH7-SW1

To steal Apple's example:

int multiplier = 7;
int (^myBlock)(int) = ^(int num) {
    return num * multiplier;
};

printf("%d", myBlock(3));
// prints "21"
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Yes, a block indeed...

Here is a tutorial for people who are beginners to blocks!

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As Apple states in their documentation:

You use the ^ operator to declare a block variable and to indicate the beginning of a block literal. The body of the block itself is contained within {}, as shown in this example (as usual with C, ; indicates the end of the statement):

int multiplier = 7;
int (^myBlock)(int) = ^(int num) {
    return num * multiplier;
};
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Always make sure you properly quote language copied from documentation. –  Brad Larson Aug 5 '13 at 14:53

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