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I have 2 DLLs. One is PrimaryDLL.dll and the other is DLLWrap.dll. The PrimaryDLL has an object a function named DiversifyKeyset which is decalred like so in the class constructor:

static PRIMARYDLL_API std::string DiversifyKeyset(std::string Key1, std::string Key2, std::string Key3);

and here is the method defined:

    std::string tKeyset::DiversifyKeyset(std::string Key1, std::string Key2, std::string Key3)
{
    tKeyset* keyset = new tKeyset();

    keyset ->Key1 = "12345678";
    keyset ->Key2 = "23456789";
    keyset ->Key3 = "34567890";

    //return keyset --eventually I want to return this
    return 0;

}

My DLLWrap.dll calls this function like so in its .cpp file:

cout << "Here is what is returned:  " <<
firstDllLayer::tKeyset::DiversifyKeyset(a,b,c) << endl;

Now this all compiles fine and the libraries are built. My error comes when I call the C# code to call the second DLLWrap.dll. I receieve the error:

Attempted to read or write protected memory. This is often an indication that other memory is corrupt.

So I have been racking my brain as to why this is not working. I am under alot of pressure but cannot seem to find why I am receieveing this memory write error.

So to help I am providing my code.

My C++ PrimaryDLL.h file:

#pragma once

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#include <stdexcept>

extern "C"{

#ifdef PRIMARYDLL_EXPORT
    #define PRIMARYDLL_API __declspec(dllexport) 
#else
    #define PRIMARYDLL_API __declspec(dllimport)  
#endif



namespace firstDllLayer
{

class tKeyset
{


public:
    tKeyset();
    std::string Key1;
    std::string Key2;
    std::string Key3;
    tKeyset(std::string _key1, std::string _key2, std::string _key3);
    static PRIMARYDLL_API std::string DiversifyKeyset(std::string Key1, std::string Key2, std::string Key3);


};

tKeyset::tKeyset()
{
    Key1 = "";
    Key2 = "";
    Key3 = "";
}
tKeyset::tKeyset(std::string _Key1, std::string _Key2, std::string _Key3)
{
    Key1 = _Key1;
    Key2 = _Key2;
    Key3 = _Key3;
}


}
}

Here is the PrimaryDll.cpp file:

// PrimaryDll.cpp : Defines the exported functions for the DLL application.
//
#include "stdafx.h"
#include "PrimaryDll.h"
#include <stdexcept>
#include <string>
using namespace std;
namespace firstDllLayer
{
    tKeyset* MasterKeyset = new tKeyset("1234","5678","0910");
    std::string tKeyset::DiversifyKeyset(std::string Key1, std::string Key2, std::string Key3)
{
    tKeyset* keyset = new tKeyset();
    keyset ->Key1 = "12345678";
    keyset ->Key2 = "23456789";
    keyset ->Key3 = "34567890";
    //return Keyset; -eventually I would like to return this
    return 0;
}
}

Here is my DLLWrap.h file:

#pragma once

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "Primary.h"
#include <stdexcept>
#include <string>
extern "C"{
#ifdef DLLWRAPDLL_EXPORT
    #define DLLWRAP_API __declspec(dllexport) 
#else
    #define DLLWRAP_API __declspec(dllimport)  
#endif
namespace MyFunc
{
    class MyCall
        {
        public:
            static DLLWRAP_API std::string DiversifyKeysetCall(std::string a,std::string b,std::string c);
    };
}
}

The DLLWrap.cpp file:

// DLLWrap.cpp : Defines the exported functions for the DLL application.
//


#include "stdafx.h"
#include "PrimaryDll.h"
#include <stdexcept>
#include "DLLWrap.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

namespace MyFunc
{
    std::string MyCall::DiversifyKeysetCall(std::string a,std::string b,std::string c)
    {
            /*cout << "Here is what is returned:  " <<
                firstDllLayer::tKeyset::DiversifyKeyset(a,b,c) << endl;

            return 0;*/
        cout << "Here is what is returned:  " <<
                firstDllLayer::tKeyset::DiversifyKeyset(a,b,c) << endl;

            return 0;           
    }
}

And finally the C# Program.cs file:

// Marshal.cs
using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
class PlatformInvokeTest
{    public class DllHelper
    {
        [DllImport(@"C:\Users\user\Documents\Visual Studio 2010\Projects\KeyDll\Debug\DLLWrap.dll", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl, EntryPoint = "?DiversifyKeysetCall@MyCall@MyFunc@@SA?AV?$basic_string@DU?$char_traits@D@std@@V?$allocator@D@2@@std@@V34@00@Z")]

        public static extern string DiversifyKeysetCall(string a, string b, string c);
    }
    static void Main()
    {    
        try
        {
            DllHelper.DiversifyKeysetCall("1234","5678","0910");           
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }
        }
}

In my PrimaryDLL.cpp file, I would eventually like to return the object but because it is so confusing on how to reference the pointer and when i just leave the :

return keyset; 

un commented I receieve the error that it cannot convert from object type to string type.

So please anyhelp would be greatly appreciated to why I am receiving the "Attempted to read or write protected memory. This is often an indication that other memory is corrupt" error.

Best Regards.

share|improve this question
2  
You cannot pinvoke functions that use a C++ class as an argument or return value. Only C strings are supported, char* or wchar_t*. Returning a C string will not work either. –  Hans Passant Jul 16 '13 at 20:59
    
P/invoke is not designed to support classes. Not even a little bit. You might think about using either COM interop or C++/CLI "It Just Works" interop. –  Ben Voigt Jul 16 '13 at 21:37

2 Answers 2

std::string tKeyset::DiversifyKeyset(...) {
  return 0;
}

This calls std::string(const char*) constructor, passing a NULL pointer. This is illegal.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok so what should I do instead? I would like to return the object I create but i have issues with this as well. I receieve: code13 IntelliSense: no suitable constructor exists to convert from "firstDllLayer::tKeyset *" to "std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char>>" code –  user2577497 Jul 16 '13 at 20:53
    
If you want to return tKeyset*, why do you declare the function with the return type of std::string? –  Igor Tandetnik Jul 16 '13 at 20:58
    
because it throws an error that I need to specify a return type. it assumes int but I am not sure what I should declare here. I want to return the object but just not sure how... –  user2577497 Jul 16 '13 at 21:35
    
If you want a function to return a value of type T, then naturally you should specify T as the return type of said function. –  Igor Tandetnik Jul 16 '13 at 21:43
    
Ok I undestand so I have now changed from: std::string tKeyset::DiversifyKeyset(...) { return 0; } to tKeyset tKeyset::DiversifyKeyset(...) { return keyset; } I have a also declared in the PrimaryDll.h file this so to clear up any confusion: static PRIMARYDLL_API tKeyset DiversifyKeyset(std::string KIC, std::string KID, std::string KIK); instead of the return type std::string. I am getting an error when I return keyset; It says: no suitable constructor exists to convert from "firstDllLayer::tKeyset *" to "firstDllLayer::tKeyset" So I realize its a pointer but how to reference? –  user2577497 Jul 16 '13 at 21:51

Its a bad Idea in general to create an object in c++ dll and hand it back to c#. The ownership of the memory becomes a problem. Strings are ok because they get Marshaled across by coping from c memory to the c# owned memory.

I suggest you simplify the whole thing by passing the three strings separately and building your keyset object already in c#.

Another option is to flatten you keyset object into a binary array of bytes. Then have a custom function when you get it back to unflatten it back into an object.

Here is what i have done before

[DllImport("Helper.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
private static extern bool GetStuff(
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] StringBuilder inputString,
    byte[] outputBuffer, 
    UInt32 outputSize,
    ref UInt32 outputFinalSize);

public static void DoStuff(string inputString)
{
    int buffSize = 4000;
    byte[] buff = new byte[buffSize];
    StringBuilder inputString = new StringBuilder();
    inputString.Append(blobs);
    UInt32 size = 0;

    if (!GetStuff(inputString, buff, (uint)buffSize, ref size) || size == 0)
    {
        //ERROR
    }

    when it comes back i just do

    StringBuilder outputString;
    for (uint i = 0; i < outputFinalSize; i++)
    {
        outputString.Append((char)buff[i]);
    }

    outputString.toString();
}

c signatrue looks like this

extern "C" __declspec(dllexport) bool GetStuff(char* inputString, char* outputBuffer, UInt32 outputSize, UInt32& outputFinalSize);

Note that i use string builder to pass the string in as well, you may not need that... As you can see i allocate everything on the c# side so i don't have to worry about memory management of the c++, everything in c++ should get deallocated when the function completes.

Your call should look somthing like

private static extern bool DiversifyKeysetCallAndRetrunFlatBuffer(
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] StringBuilder inputStringA,
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] StringBuilder inputStringB,
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] StringBuilder inputStringC,
    byte[] outputBuffer, 
    UInt32 outputSize, 
    ref UInt32 outputFinalSize);

{
    std::string str1(inputStringA);
    std::string str2(inputStringB);
    std::string str3(inputStringC);
    KeySet key = DiversifyKeyset(str1, str2, str3);

    outputFinalSize = key.SerializeToBuffer(outputBuffer, outputSize);

    if (outputFinalSize == 0) 
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

int KeySet::SerializeToBuffer(char* buffer, size_t bufferSize)
{
    //We are going to fill the buffer like so "key1|key2|key3"

    size_t totalSize = Key1.size() + Key2.size() + Key3.size() + 4;
    if (bufferSize < totalSize)
    {
        return 0; // buffer too small
    }
    char* bufferCurr = buffer;


    memcpy(bufferCurr, Key1.c_str(), Key1.size());
    bufferCurr += Key1.size();
    bufferCurr[0] = '|';
    bufferCurr++;

    memcpy(bufferCurr, Key2.c_str(), Key2.size());
    bufferCurr += Key2.size();
    bufferCurr[0] = '|';
    bufferCurr++;

    memcpy(bufferCurr, Key3.c_str(), Key3.size());
    bufferCurr += Key3.size();
    bufferCurr[0] = '\0';
    return totalSize;
}

And finally on the c# side you would convert the buffer to a string and do a split by | to get all 3 keys, then create a c# KeySet Object that has the 3 strings.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok yes this sounds like a great idea. I can build the tKeyset object in C# and then pass the strings in as parameters that I built in the C++? How can I return the strings then? –  user2577497 Jul 16 '13 at 21:38
    
Ok wow I will have to research this method. So you think that me returning a object from C++ will have an adverse effect on the memory allocation? DO you see any way that I can have the DLL to return the object instead? Seems to be more of what I am geared towards right now, or at least what is feasible for me on my end. –  user2577497 Jul 16 '13 at 22:22
    
The issue with the allocation is that you cant just pass a pointer back because the dll may delete the memory, or you will have to keep it there and delete it with a different call. So instead Marshaling is used from c to c# where the whole contents of the object are copied to be passed. So that the memory management remains independent. Unfortunately the CLR marshaler doesn't know how to marshal anything more complex than structs of basic types. –  madnut Jul 16 '13 at 22:31
    
So you have to options you can add another wrapper in managed c++ around your c call then call the managed c++ function and get the object directly (since they are both managed GC will handle the memory). Or like I said serialize the object into a byte buffer and then have a function for deserializing the object from the char buffer in c# into a c# object. I already showed how to pass the char buffer around. –  madnut Jul 16 '13 at 22:35
    
Hi again! Ok so I am trying to implement your solution above for the flattening of my keyset object into an array of bytes.I am just a little confused on how I would call this in the c# because I import my DLL, and then have both functions, your and mine like so : private static extern bool GetStuff([MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)] StringBuilder inputString, byte[] outputBuffer, UInt32 outputSize, ref UInt32 outputFinalSize); public static extern string DiversifyKeysetCall(string a, string b, string c); isDiversifyKeysetCall be passing in a string still or a object? –  user2577497 Jul 17 '13 at 15:14

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