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I have to construct a dictionary using variables base=10 and digits=set(range(10)) and have to write a comprehension that maps each integer from 0 through 999 to the list of three digits that represents that integer in base 10. That is, the value should be

{0: [0, 0, 0], 1: [0, 0, 1], 2: [0, 0, 2], 3: [0, 0, 3], ...,10: [0, 1, 0], 11: [0, 1, 1], 12: [0, 1, 2], ...,999: [9, 9, 9]}

I am stuck .

I tried something like

{q:[x,y,z] for q in list[range(1000)] for x in digits for y in digits for z in digits}   

but the index q should be x * base**2 + y * base**1 + z * base**0

this is not the right way of thinking, any idea?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 2 down vote accepted
alphabet =  range(10)
base = 10
dict((x*base**2+y*base+z,(x,y,z)) for x in alphabet 
                                  for y in alphabet 
                                  for z in alphabet )

is what you want ... i think

alphabet =  range(2)
base = 2
dict((x*base**2+y*base+z,(x,y,z)) for x in alphabet 
                                  for y in alphabet 
                                  for z in alphabet )

generates

{0: (0, 0, 0), 1: (0, 0, 1), 2: (0, 1, 0), 3: (0, 1, 1), 4: (1, 0, 0), 5: (1, 0, 1), 6: (1, 1, 0), 7: (1, 1, 1)}
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I would use itertools. For example

dict( (i, tup) for i, tup in enumerate(itertools.product(range(10), repeat=3)) )

If you really require each value to be a list, you can add (i, list(tup)) above.

The product function computes cartesian product, equivalent to a nested for-loop, according to the documentation. For example

In [34]: list(itertools.product(range(3), repeat=3))
Out[34]: 
[(0, 0, 0),
 (0, 0, 1),
 (0, 0, 2),
 (0, 1, 0),
 (0, 1, 1),
 (0, 1, 2),
 (0, 2, 0),
 (0, 2, 1),
 (0, 2, 2),
 (1, 0, 0),
 (1, 0, 1),
 (1, 0, 2),
 (1, 1, 0),
 (1, 1, 1),
 (1, 1, 2),
 (1, 2, 0),
 (1, 2, 1),
 (1, 2, 2),
 (2, 0, 0),
 (2, 0, 1),
 (2, 0, 2),
 (2, 1, 0),
 (2, 1, 1),
 (2, 1, 2),
 (2, 2, 0),
 (2, 2, 1),
 (2, 2, 2)]

product(range(3), repeat=3) is equivalent to product(range(3), range(3), range(3)). The product function accepts *iterables, so the above syntax is valid.

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You can use divmod to decompose each number:

d = {}
for i in xrange(base**3):
    a,b = divmod(i, base**2)
    b,c = divmod(b, base)
    d[i] = [a,b,c]

Alternately, a constructive solution using the rarely-used reduce function:

from itertools import product
d = {reduce(lambda x,y: base*x+y, p):list(p) for p in product(xrange(base), repeat=3)}
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this assignment i think is about generating all counting sequences up to 3 characters in any base ... –  Joran Beasley Jul 16 '13 at 21:48
    
Good call, I made the change to use an arbitrary base. –  nneonneo Jul 16 '13 at 21:50
    
it doesnt allow for arbitrary alphabets but yeah thats closer to what they want(+1) –  Joran Beasley Jul 16 '13 at 21:51
1  
Alphabets? The digits are just integers. You could use them as indices into some alphabetical representation afterwards. –  nneonneo Jul 16 '13 at 21:52

There are a few wrong things in your code:

  • You use list, which is a type, as an array. Maybe you meant to write list(range(1000))? Just use range(1000).
  • Your for q in range(1000) is too many: you have a total loop of 1000*10*10*10 instead of a 10*10*10 loop.

Without modifying too much of your code, here is what you should write (by using your code for computing q):

{(x*base**2 + y*base**1 + z*base**0):[x,y,z] for q in list[range(1000)] for x in digits for y in digits for z in digits}
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base = 10 digits = set(range(10)) dict = {(xbase2 + ybase1 + z*base**0):[x,y,z] for x in digits for y in digits for z in digits} –  Nikola Stanisic Jul 18 '13 at 21:14
    
Yeah, but I forgot to tell you that set(range(10)) is not necessary. You can just use range(10) (which returns a list), having a set doesn't change anything (you use a set when you want unique items, but range(10) already returns a list of unique items) –  groug Jul 19 '13 at 18:15
f= lambda x : [int(x/100),int(x/10)%10,x%10]
k={}
for p in xrange(0,1000):
   k[p]=f(p)

or even:

d = {x: [int(x/100),int(x/10)%10,x%10]  for x in xrange(0,1000)}
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What about this:

{x:map(int,str(x).rjust(3,'0')) for x in xrange(1000)}
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Here is a nice one-liner:

result = dict((n,['0']*(3-len(str(n))) + list(str(n))) for n in xrange(1000))
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This will let you change the base:

import numpy as np
base = 10
nmax = 10
fill = len(np.base_repr(nmax, base=base))
d = {q:map(int, list(np.base_repr(q, base=base).zfill(fill))) for q in range(nmax+1)}
print(d)

str.zfill will left-pad the string result of numpy.base_repr with zeros out to a specified length (fill in my case).

For base=10, nmax=10 (you would want nmax=999).

{0: [0, 0], 1: [0, 1], 2: [0, 2], 3: [0, 3], 4: [0, 4], 5: [0, 5], 6: [0, 6], 7: [0, 7], 8: [0, 8], 9: [0, 9], 10: [1, 0]}

for base=2, nmax=10:

{0: [0, 0, 0, 0], 1: [0, 0, 0, 1], 2: [0, 0, 1, 0], 3: [0, 0, 1, 1], 4: [0, 1, 0, 0], 5: [0, 1, 0, 1], 6: [0, 1, 1, 0], 7: [0, 1, 1, 1], 8: [1, 0, 0, 0], 9: [1, 0, 0, 1], 10: [1, 0, 1, 0]}
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Thank you friends, I found a solution, I think the easiest way to figure out something like this since I'm a beginner

base = 10

digits = set(range(10))

dict = {(x*base**2 + y*base**1 + z*base**0):[x,y,z] for x in digits for y in digits for z in digits}

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the basic algorithm I'd use would be

for(1->1000)
  {
     if(x < 10)
         insert(x,[0,0,x]))
     else if(x<100)
         insert(x,[0,x/10,x%10]))
     else
         insert(x,[x/100,x/10,x%10]))
  }
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So for 999 you want to get [9, 99, 9]? –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 16 '13 at 21:42

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