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What I'm trying to do is make something like this thick line in CSS.

  1. How would I recreate that line in CSS such that it's a border-right of a div?
  2. How would I make the top of the line fade out (so it looks like this)?

Thanks.

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Basically, you can't do it with border-right, but what have you tried so far? Show us some code please. –  xec Jul 16 '13 at 21:50
    
I haven't any because I have no idea where to start. :/ –  John Smith Jul 16 '13 at 21:51
    
Take a look at these examples. –  kalley Jul 16 '13 at 21:52
    
Any way to make the borders not just a simple solid color? The one I want to have has a very slight shadow on the right-inside. –  John Smith Jul 16 '13 at 21:56
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marked as duplicate by Bojangles, Baghoo, oGeez, Ian, Joe Jul 17 '13 at 13:04

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2 Answers

Have a look at this: http://codepen.io/MisterGrumpyPants/pen/yEzpd

Does that do what you're looking for?

The method there is to absolutely position one (pseudo)element with your fading gradient (white to transparent) over another (pseudo)element with your double border (and a slight gradient shadow, as you mentioned in your comment).

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if linear-gradient are fine with you to be used :

http://codepen.io/anon/pen/AucdB

.fade {
  padding:5px 15px;
  background:
    linear-gradient(180deg ,  white 30%, rgba(255,255,255,0)) repeat,
    linear-gradient(90deg ,  black 1px, rgba(255,255,255,0) 1px, rgba(255,255,255,0)) no-repeat,
    linear-gradient(90deg , rgba(255,255,255,0) 5px,black 5px, black 6px, rgba(255,255,255,0) 6px, rgba(255,255,255,0)) no-repeat;
  background-color:white;
}
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