Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How do accomplish this join in SQL?

TABLE1

+----+-----------+-----------+---------+
| ID | FILTER1   | FILTER2   | DATA1   |
| 1  | filter1-A | filter2-A | data1-A |
| 2  | filter1-B | filter2-B | data1-B |
+----+-----------+-----------+---------+

TABLE2

+----+-----------+-----------+---------+
| ID | FILTER1   | FILTER2   | DATA1   |
| 1  | filter1-B | filter2-B | data2-B |
| 2  | filter1-C | filter2-C | data2-C |
+----+-----------+-----------+---------+

Result

+------------+-----------+---------+---------+
| FILTER1    | FILTER2   | DATA1   | DATA2   | 
| filter1-A  | filter2-A | data1-A | NULL    | 
| filter1-B  | filter2-B | data1-B | data2-B | 
| filter1-C  | filter2-C | NULL    | data2-C | 
+------------+-----------+---------+---------+
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
SELECT
  COALESCE(TABLE1.filter_1, TABLE2.filter_1)   AS filter_1,
  COALESCE(TABLE1.filter_1, TABLE2.filter_2)   AS filter_2,
  TABLE1.data1                                 AS data_1,
  TABLE2.data2                                 AS data_2
FROM
  TABLE1
FULL OUTER JOIN
  TABLE2
    ON  TABLE1.filter_1 = TABLE2.filter_1
    AND TABLE1.filter_2 = TABLE2.filter_2

The FULL OUTER JOIN keeps every record from each table, regardless of whether or not there is a match in the other table.

The COALESCE() (Some use ISNULL()) then can be used to scan through missing/NULL values to find the first non-NULL value.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1: sqlfiddle.com/#!6/ee2ce/5/0 –  Tim Schmelter Jul 16 '13 at 22:07
    
Please verify my logic here: If I knew that TABLE1 contained all filter combinations, I could use a left join and not use COALESCE, and my query would be much faster. –  mattalxndr Jul 16 '13 at 22:20
    
@MattAlexander - COALESCE will hardly affect performance at all. Scalar Functions, even when performed on huge numbers of output records, are nearly always trivial compared to the joins themselves. But yes, in your new example you could use LEFT JOIN, and that may have a performance benefit, depending on indexes, etc. –  MatBailie Jul 16 '13 at 22:23

This is called a FULL OUTER JOIN.

SELECT 
  ISNULL(T1.FILTER1, T2.FILTER1) AS FILTER_1, 
  ISNULL(T1.FILTER2, T2.FILTER2) AS FILTER_2,
  T1.DATA1 AS DATA_1, 
  T2.DATA1 AS DATA_2
FROM TABLE1 T1
FULL OUTER JOIN TABLE2 T2
  ON T1.FILTER1 = T2.FILTER1
 AND T1.FILTER2 = T2.FILTER2
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I forgot to coalesce the TABLE1.FILTER1 and TABLE2.FILTER1 into one single column. I was too quick to answer and focused on the 'join' part, let me edit my answer. –  jods Jul 16 '13 at 22:07
    
Isn't ISNULL is non standard SQL bahavior? –  user1759572 Jul 16 '13 at 22:22
    
@user1759572 - the OP states SQL-SERVER and ISNULL is perfectly normal there. –  MatBailie Jul 16 '13 at 22:26
    
@user1759572 I think it's non-standard, I'm not 100% sure. But the question is tagged sql-server and it's shorter to write than the (rather long) COALESCE, so... –  jods Jul 16 '13 at 22:27
SELECT G.FILTER1, G.FILTER2, T1.DATA1, T2.DATA1 as DATA2 FROM
    (SELECT FILTER1, FILTER2
    FROM TABLE1
  UNION
    SELECT FILTER1, FILTER2
    FROM TABLE2
  GROUP BY FILTER1, FILTER2) as G
LEFT JOIN TABLE1 as T1 ON T1.FILTER1 = G.FILTER1 AND T1.FILTER2 = G.FILTER2
LEFT JOIN TABLE2 as T2 ON T2.FILTER1 = G.FILTER1 AND T2.FILTER2 = G.FILTER2
share|improve this answer
1  
Why would this be preferable to a FULL OUTER JOIN? It would seem to be be twice as many reads... –  MatBailie Jul 16 '13 at 22:24
    
No preference, just another way of doing it. In case of performance it is not as performant as FULL OUTER JOIN. –  user1759572 Jul 16 '13 at 22:28

You can also do this with union all and group by -- assuming that neither table has duplicates within the table:

select filter_1, filter_2, max(data_1) as data_1, max(data_2) as data_2
from ((select filter_1, filter_2, data_1, NULL as data_2
       from table1
      ) union all
      (select filter_1, filter_2, NULL, data_2
       from table2
      )
     ) t
group by filter_1, filter_2;

I offer this as an alternative. For one thing, it is interesting (to me) that union all/group by can behave the same was as full outer join. More importantly, if you start to add more tables, then the full outer join approach becomes cumbersome. Expanding this approach to more tables is easy.

share|improve this answer
    
Would you not need the first SELECT in the UNION to explicitly cast the NULL to the correct data-type? If not, what rules does SQL Server use to determine the data-type of the field initialised with a NULL? –  MatBailie Jul 17 '13 at 19:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.