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Here is my code:

import math

def distance(argv):
    comp_diff = []
    for comp_1, comp_2 in argv.iteritems():
        comp_diff.append(comp_1-comp_2)
        print comp_2
    return math.sqrt(sum([math.pow(comp,2) for comp in comp_diff]))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    components = {0:4, 0:5, 0:4}
    d = distance(components)
    print d

The output is:

4
4.0

Whereas it should be:

4
5
4
5.1

Why is this happening? I changed the length of the components dictionary and it it became apparent that only the last key value pair shows up and is iterated through. Why is this? Pardon my novice in Python.

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2  
Each key in a dictionary can only have 1 value. Try using a list of tuples or something similar. –  wflynny Jul 16 '13 at 22:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are not using the dictionary correctly:

>>> components = {0:4, 0:5, 0:4}
>>> components
{0: 4}

you could use a list of tuples instead.

import math

def distance(argv):
    comp_diff = []
    for comp_1, comp_2 in argv:
        comp_diff.append(comp_1-comp_2)
        print comp_2
    return math.sqrt(sum([math.pow(comp,2) for comp in comp_diff]))

if __name__ == '__main__':
    components = [(0,4), (0,5), (0,4)]
    d = distance(components)
    print d
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Fantastic, I knew it had to be something simple like this. –  phileaton Jul 16 '13 at 22:53
    
if you need to check if a point is defined, you can use a set rather than a list as well. –  dnozay Jul 16 '13 at 22:59

A dict can only have one value per key. Python is throwing away 2 of those key-value pairs.

(Unrelated note that might help you avoid future trouble: Dict key-value pairs are unordered. Don't try to rely on any particular iteration order.)

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