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For a list ["foo","bar","baz"] and an item in the list "bar", what's the cleanest way to get its index (1) in Python?

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11 Answers

up vote 595 down vote accepted
>>> ["foo","bar","baz"].index('bar')
1

Reference: Data Structures > More on Lists

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One thing that is really helpful in learning Python is to use the interactive help function:

>>> help(["foo", "bar", "baz"])
Help on list object:

class list(object)
 ...

 |
 |  index(...)
 |      L.index(value, [start, [stop]]) -> integer -- return first index of value
 |

which will often lead you to the method you are looking for.

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68  
Upvoted for actually showing how to find the solution. –  Iceland_jack Mar 9 '11 at 12:10
12  
Holy crap, never knew of this.. –  jmoz Aug 27 '12 at 15:16
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Surprised no one has yet mentioned enumerate():

for i, j in enumerate(['foo', 'bar', 'baz']):
    if j == 'bar':
        print i

This can be more useful than index if there are duplicates in the list, because index() only returns the first occurrence, while enumerate returns all occurrences.

As a list comprehension:

[i for i, j in enumerate(['foo', 'bar', 'baz']) if j == 'foo']

Here's also another small solution with itertools.count() (which is pretty much the same approach as enumerate):

from itertools import izip as zip, count # izip for maximum efficiency
[i for i, j in zip(count(), ['foo', 'bar', 'baz']) if j == 'foo']

This is more efficient for larger lists than using enumerate():

$ python -m timeit -s "from itertools import izip as zip, count" "[i for i, j in zip(count(), ['foo', 'bar', 'baz']*500) if j == 'foo']"
10000 loops, best of 3: 174 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit "[i for i, j in enumerate(['foo', 'bar', 'baz']*500) if j == 'foo']"
10000 loops, best of 3: 196 usec per loop
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index() returns the first index of value!

| index(...)
| L.index(value, [start, [stop]]) -> integer -- return first index of value

def all_indices(value, qlist):
    indices = []
    idx = -1
    while True:
        try:
            idx = qlist.index(value, idx+1)
            indices.append(idx)
        except ValueError:
            break
    return indices

all_indices("foo", ["foo","bar","baz","foo"])
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3  
this post also helps: stackoverflow.com/questions/4664850/… –  Hongbo Zhu Dec 7 '11 at 10:19
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a = ["foo","bar","baz",'bar','any','much']

b = [item for item in range(len(a)) if a[item] == 'bar']
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?? Why would you do it like this? If you wanted to use a list comprehension you'd do it like b = [item for item in a if a == 'bar'][0] –  Michael Matthew Toomim Sep 29 '12 at 22:26
1  
This way you can get more than one index –  erickrf Dec 23 '12 at 20:38
    
This is also great if you need more than simple equality. [ii for ii in range(len(a)) if a[ii][0] == 'b'] gives you the index of everything that starts with 'b', for example - not helpful with strings, but sorting tuples on the nth key is handy. –  polm23 Feb 14 '13 at 5:32
4  
@MichaelMatthewToomim: The code in the answer returns the list of indices with matching values, like` [1, 3, 19]. Your list comprehension will return a list like ['bar','bar','bar']` which really isn't helpful. –  André Caron Apr 17 '13 at 0:56
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To get all indexes:

 indexes = [i for i,x in enumerate(xs) if x == 'foo']
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Problem will arrise if the element is not in the list. You can use this function, it handles the issue:

if element is found it returns index of element else returns -1

def find_element_in_list(element,list_element):
        try:
            index_element=list_element.index(element)
            return index_element
        except ValueError:
            return -1
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11  
Now you've got a tricky bug, when you later use the index to retrieve from the container and get the last item. The behaviour of index is better; you can check for error (by using an exception handler), or if you can't handle it it propagates outward; all the code after the index can assume that the index is valid, because it won't be executed unless it was (or an exception handler has fixed the problem). Returning -1 to indicate error forces you to handle the error, and if you forget to you get silent data corruption. –  Ben May 29 '13 at 8:35
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All of the proposed functions here reproduce inherent language behavior but obscure what's going on.

[i for i in range(len(mylist)) if mylist[i]==myterm] # get the indices
[each for each in mylist if each==myterm] # get the items
mylist.index(myterm) if myterm in mylist else None # get the first index and fail quietly

Why write a function with exception handling if the language provides the methods to do what you want itself?

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Simply you can go with

a = [['hand', 'head'], ['phone', 'wallet'], ['lost', 'stock']]
b = ['phone', 'lost']

res = [[x[0] for x in a].index(y) for y in b]
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Another option

>>> a = ['red', 'blue', 'green', 'red']
>>> b = 'red'
>>> offset = 0;
>>> indices = list()
>>> for i in range(a.count(b)):
...     indices.append(a.index(b,offset))
...     offset = indices[-1]+1
... 
>>> indices
[0, 3]
>>> 
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A variant on the answer from FMc and user7177 will give a dict that can return all indices for any entry:

>>> a = ['foo','bar','baz','bar','any', 'foo', 'much']
>>> l = dict(zip(set(a), map(lambda y: [i for i,z in enumerate(a) if z is y ], set(a))))
>>> l['foo']
[0, 5]
>>> l ['much']
[6]
>>> l
{'baz': [2], 'foo': [0, 5], 'bar': [1, 3], 'any': [4], 'much': [6]}
>>> 

You could also use this as a one liner to get all indices for a single entry. There are no guarantees for efficiency, though I did use set(a) to reduce the number of times the lambda is called.

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