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I'm trying to get data from 2 tables with one SQL statement using joins. The idea is quite simple. A project has participants, and in a project overview I want to show the project info with the amount of participants.

Right now there are 2 projects, one project with participants and the other project without participants.

I use this query:

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS `p`.`id`,
       `p`.`title`, 
       `p`.`live`, 
       `p`.`startDate`,
       `p`.`endDate`, 
       COUNT(`part`.`id`) AS `participants`
FROM `projects` `p`
LEFT OUTER JOIN `participants` `part`
    ON `p`.`id`  = `part`.`projectid`
ORDER BY `p`.`live` DESC, 
         `p`.`startDate` DESC
LIMIT 0,10

Problem is, this query only returns the project with participants and the one without participants is left out.

What am I doing wrong here?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have to use GROUP BY

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS `p`.`id`,
       `p`.`title`, 
       `p`.`live`, 
       `p`.`startDate`,
       `p`.`endDate`, 
       COUNT(`part`.`id`) AS `participants`
FROM `projects` `p`
LEFT OUTER JOIN `participants` `part`
    ON `p`.`id`  = `part`.`projectid`
GROUP BY `p`.`id`,
         `p`.`title`, 
         `p`.`live`, 
         `p`.`startDate`,
         `p`.`endDate`
ORDER BY `p`.`live` DESC, 
         `p`.`startDate` DESC
LIMIT 0,10

Here is SQLFiddle demo

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This worked! Thanks! Could you please explain me why? I now know that it's works, but I don't really have an idea why it works. –  FIA2008 Jul 17 '13 at 7:16
1  
You should use GROUP BY since you're applying an aggregate function COUNT() and want to get results per group (in your case per project) and not a single value. –  peterm Jul 17 '13 at 7:18
    
I'm actually quite interested now, how does the performance of this look compared to a correlated subquery? Would it be similar or could this be potentially more efficient? –  Kaiwa Jul 17 '13 at 7:20
    
Thanks peterm, you really helped me here –  FIA2008 Jul 17 '13 at 7:21
    
In MySql Subqueries perform poorly. That being said as always with performance you have look at execution plan with EXPLAIN and benchmark queries. –  peterm Jul 17 '13 at 7:26

I don't think this should be done with a JOIN but rather with a correlated subquery.

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS `p`.`id`,
   `p`.`title`, 
   `p`.`live`, 
   `p`.`startDate`,
   `p`.`endDate`, 
   (SELECT COUNT(`part`.`id`) FROM `participants` `part` WHERE `part`.`projectid` = `p`.`id`) AS `participants`
FROM `projects` `p`
ORDER BY `p`.`live` DESC, 
     `p`.`startDate` DESC
LIMIT 0,10
share|improve this answer
    
But according to this: codinghorror.com/blog/2007/10/… It should be possible to do it with a join, some records should contain null or something like that. I know it can be done with a subquery, but it doesn't look as nice as a join I think. –  FIA2008 Jul 17 '13 at 7:12
    
Then you will have to look at peterm his solution. Both these queries give the same result, his is probably the one you want! –  Kaiwa Jul 17 '13 at 7:16

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