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I'm new to R and it looks like it is a good language to allow my colleagues to their job in a quick way, but I have to prepare the data for them and I want to do it "the R way".

the data I'm importing describes numeric measurements taken at various locations for more or less evenly spread timestamps. sometimes this "evenly spread" is not really true and I have to discard some of the values, it's not that important which one, as long as I have one value for each timestamp for each location.

what I do with the data? I add it to a result data.frame. There I have a timestamp column and the values in the timestamp column, they are definitely evenly spaced according to the step.

timestamps <- ceiling(as.numeric((timestamps-epoch)*24*60/step))*step*60 + epoch
result[result$timestamp %in% timestamps, columnName] <- values


This does NOT work when I have timestamps that fall in the same time step. This is an example:

> data.frame(ts=timestamps, v=values)
                   ts         v
1 2009-09-30 10:00:00 -2.081609
2 2009-09-30 10:04:18 -2.079778
3 2009-09-30 10:07:47 -2.113531
4 2009-09-30 10:09:01 -2.124716
5 2009-09-30 10:15:00 -2.102117
6 2009-09-30 10:27:56 -2.093542
7 2009-09-30 10:30:00 -2.092626
8 2009-09-30 10:45:00 -2.086339
9 2009-09-30 11:00:00 -2.080144
> data.frame(ts=ceiling(as.numeric((timestamps-epoch)*24*60/step))*step*60+epoch,
+ v=values)
                   ts         v
1 2009-09-30 10:00:00 -2.081609
2 2009-09-30 10:15:00 -2.079778
3 2009-09-30 10:15:00 -2.113531
4 2009-09-30 10:15:00 -2.124716
5 2009-09-30 10:15:00 -2.102117
6 2009-09-30 10:30:00 -2.093542
7 2009-09-30 10:30:00 -2.092626
8 2009-09-30 10:45:00 -2.086339
9 2009-09-30 11:00:00 -2.080144

in Python I would (mis)use a dictionary to achieve what I need:

dict(zip(timestamps, values)).items()

returns a list of pairs where the first coordinate is unique.

in R I don't know how to do it in a compact and efficient way.

share|improve this question
    
Can I suggest renaming this question to: how to remove duplicates from a data frame? This doesn't seem to have much to do with a dictionary in the end... –  Shane Nov 20 '09 at 14:29
    
quite right, done. –  mariotomo Nov 20 '09 at 15:40
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2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

I would use subset combined with duplicated to filter non-unique timestamps in the second data frame:

R> df_ <- read.table(textConnection('
                     ts         v
1 "2009-09-30 10:00:00" -2.081609
2 "2009-09-30 10:15:00" -2.079778
3 "2009-09-30 10:15:00" -2.113531
4 "2009-09-30 10:15:00" -2.124716
5 "2009-09-30 10:15:00" -2.102117
6 "2009-09-30 10:30:00" -2.093542
7 "2009-09-30 10:30:00" -2.092626
8 "2009-09-30 10:45:00" -2.086339
9 "2009-09-30 11:00:00" -2.080144
'), as.is=TRUE, header=TRUE)

R> subset(df_, !duplicated(ts))
                   ts      v
1 2009-09-30 10:00:00 -2.082
2 2009-09-30 10:15:00 -2.080
6 2009-09-30 10:30:00 -2.094
8 2009-09-30 10:45:00 -2.086
9 2009-09-30 11:00:00 -2.080

Update: To select a specific value you can use aggregate

aggregate(df_$v, by=list(df_$ts), function(x) x[1])  # first value
aggregate(df_$v, by=list(df_$ts), function(x) tail(x, n=1))  # last value
aggregate(df_$v, by=list(df_$ts), function(x) max(x))  # max value
share|improve this answer
    
this works, thanks! but how did you find it in the documentation? not even now that I know the answer do I manage to guess where to look! ALSO: imagine I did want to choose which value (say, the last one), does subset offer the possibility? –  mariotomo Nov 20 '09 at 13:04
    
one addition: 'subset' can also be used to remove duplicates from vectors? if so, how? –  mariotomo Nov 20 '09 at 16:19
    
It could be used, but unique(vec) is simpler. –  rcs Nov 20 '09 at 18:05
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I think you are looking at data structures for time-indexed objects, and not for a dictionary. For the former, look at the zoo and xts packages which offer much better time-pased subsetting:

R> library(xts)
R> X <- xts(data.frame(val=rnorm(10)), \
            order.by=Sys.time() + sort(runif(10,10,300)))
R> X
                        val
2009-11-20 07:06:17 -1.5564
2009-11-20 07:06:40 -0.2960
2009-11-20 07:07:50 -0.4123
2009-11-20 07:08:18 -1.5574
2009-11-20 07:08:45 -1.8846
2009-11-20 07:09:47  0.4550
2009-11-20 07:09:57  0.9598
2009-11-20 07:10:11  1.0018
2009-11-20 07:10:12  1.0747
2009-11-20 07:10:58  0.7062
R> X["2009-11-20 07:08::2009-11-20 07:09"]
                        val
2009-11-20 07:08:18 -1.5574
2009-11-20 07:08:45 -1.8846
2009-11-20 07:09:47  0.4550
2009-11-20 07:09:57  0.9598
R>

The X object is ordered by a time sequence -- make sure it is of type POSIXct so you may need to parse your dates first. Then we can just index for '7:08 to 7:09 on the give day'.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm actually just trying to remove duplicates. I don't do much with the timestamps. thanks for pointing me to this library, but I think I prefer not adding dependencies. –  mariotomo Nov 20 '09 at 13:22
    
Look at unique() and duplicated() for that, and still use POSIXct types. –  Dirk Eddelbuettel Nov 20 '09 at 13:33
1  
about POSIXct types, stackoverflow.com/questions/1803627 helps understanding why Dirk Eddelbuettel suggests using it. –  mariotomo Dec 1 '09 at 10:35
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