Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like change the value of a global variable. It's working perfect when I execute the function normally. But it's not when I execute it with a tee. I need the tee in order to have both output on the screen and on the file.

Why the Tee causes this behavior ? Is there a way to modify the global variable within the function with Tee ?

FCT_main()
{
MY_VAR=2
}

MY_VAR=1

echo "MY_VAR=$MY_VAR"   # -> print 1.
FCT_main | tee file.out
echo "MY_VAR=$MY_VAR"   # -> print 1, but I expect 2 !

echo "\n"

echo "MY_VAR=$MY_VAR"   # -> print 1.
FCT_main
echo "MY_VAR=$MY_VAR"   # -> print 2 as expected.
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

The problem is not with tee. It's with pipe operation. Each command in a pipe is executed in separate subshells.

So any changes made to the variables in functions are not reflected.

You can do the following process substitution, but still its not equivalent to piping.

FCT_main > >( tee file.out )

Note:Process substitution works only with some shells. This code was found working with bash shell.

Entire code

FCT_main()
{
MY_VAR=2
}

MY_VAR=1

echo "MY_VAR=$MY_VAR"   # -> print 1.
FCT_main > >( tee file.out )
echo "MY_VAR=$MY_VAR"   # -> print 1, but I expect 2 !

echo "\n"

echo "MY_VAR=$MY_VAR"   # -> print 1.
FCT_main
echo "MY_VAR=$MY_VAR"   # -> print 2 as expected.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks yor the explanation. I tried your other way but I get a syntax error : code./test.sh[10]: syntax error at line 10 : (' unexpected –  Sephi Jul 17 '13 at 14:18
    
@Sephi I've added the entire code to the answer. try copy paste it as it is and execute. –  Antarus Jul 17 '13 at 18:11
    
Ok i get it, it's working fine on Linux but sadly I'm using SunOS :( –  Sephi Jul 18 '13 at 5:38
    
@Sephi which shell are you using echo $SHELLand your os version uname -a? –  Antarus Jul 18 '13 at 6:43
    
Using Korn Shell (ksh). OS version is SunOS 5.10 Generic_147441-27 i86pc i386 –  Sephi Jul 19 '13 at 8:05
show 1 more comment

The same problem occurs in the following snippet:

i=0
cat $file | while read line; do
    i=$(($i + 1))
done

i will be 0 at the end of the loop.

i=0
while read line; do
    i=$(($i + 1))
done < $file

will actually work. The problem is that while is executed in a subshell (and so is cat for that matter) when used in a pipe-line, but not when redirecting stdin.

If you post the actual code we might be able to help you devise a solution to your specific snippet.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.