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I have a std::vector<float> with the following layout of data

x1 | y1 | z1 | x2 | y2 | z2 | .... | xn | yn | zn

I'm trying to figure out an STL-ish way to get the maximum x element as well as y or z

The obvious

double xyzmax = *std::max_element(myvector.begin(),myvector.end() );

picks the absolute maximum and does not allow me to specify the stride. Is there some trick with no for loops?

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2  
Why can't you use loops? –  hetepeperfan Jul 17 '13 at 9:55
    
Instead of using normal iterators you could use skip iterators, that jump not one but three elements on incrementing. –  Arne Mertz Jul 17 '13 at 9:57
    
The trouble with the STL functions like these, is they are fine in simple cases but when you want to do something more complicated (as often happens in a real project), you have to write loops again. –  Neil Kirk Jul 17 '13 at 9:58
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is a reference implementation of std::max_element.

template<class ForwardIt>
ForwardIt max_element(ForwardIt first, ForwardIt last)
{
    if (first == last) {
        return last;
    }
    ForwardIt largest = first;
    ++first;
    for (; first != last; ++first) {
        if (*largest < *first) {
            largest = first;
        }
    }
    return largest;
}

You can create your own algorithm by modifying this in the following way:

template<class ForwardIt>
ForwardIt max_element_nth(ForwardIt first, ForwardIt last, int n)
{
    if (first == last) {
        return last;
    }
    ForwardIt largest = first;
    first += n;
    for (; first < last; first += n) {
        if (*largest < *first) {
            largest = first;
        }
    }
    return largest;
}

Of course it has the limitation of working only with random access iterators, but it certainly works for vector.

double xmax = *max_element_nth(myvector.begin(),myvector.end(), 3);
double ymax = *max_element_nth(myvector.begin()+1,myvector.end(), 3);
double zmax = *max_element_nth(myvector.begin()+2,myvector.end(), 3);

But I'd rather do it by storing the (x, y, z) values in a structure, and take a vector of that. Then, you can use the standard max_element with a custom comparator.

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ah, but now I want also min_element, and accumulate and find etc. Are you going to port them all? –  TemplateRex Jul 17 '13 at 10:36
    
Cool! This is the answer I was looking for! –  linello Jul 17 '13 at 10:37
    
@linello great if this answer works for you, but be aware that it will not scale if you every want to use another algorithm. Algorithms are much harder to modify than it is to set up an adaptor for the iterators. –  TemplateRex Jul 17 '13 at 10:42
    
I won't down vote a nice answer like this, but somewhere in the OP was 'no for loops'. –  hetepeperfan Jul 17 '13 at 10:51
    
@hetepeperfan I guess the idea behind this answer is to wrap the redefined max_element in a seperate namespace strided so it can be used like std::max_element –  TemplateRex Jul 17 '13 at 10:59
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You could use the Boost.Iterator library and the boost::iterator_facade to create a strided iterator that can be initalized with a std::vector<float>::iterator and for which ++it does it += 3; on the underlying iterator.

Given such an iterator of type StrideIt, you could write

maxX = *std::max_element(StrideIt(v.begin() + 0), StrideIt(v.end() - 2));
maxY = *std::max_element(StrideIt(v.begin() + 1), StrideIt(v.end() - 1));
maxZ = *std::max_element(StrideIt(v.begin() + 2), StrideIt(v.end() - 0));

This is preferably to redefining the algorithms because there are many more algorithms than iterator types.

If you want maximum flexibility, you could make StrideIt a class template taking the type (float in your case) and a runtime construtor argument defining the stride (3 in your case).

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