Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to understand how client certificate authentication works with smart cards.

I read about configuring apache to authenticate users with a certificate, there are a lot of tutorials online, like this one.

As far as I understand, once the certificate has been imported, anyone who can access the computer can launch the browser and use it, thus in the scenario of several users sharing the same account (or of an attacker having physical access to the computer and able to login), the user cannot be authenticated univocally. To avoid such a problem, when the account is shared, I could try not to store the certificate in the browser.

Nowadays there are several usb tokens that can have certificates inside, which can be used to perform client certificate authentication to websites. Here are my question about such devices:

  • by importing the certificate as a physical device, will the browser let me use the certificate as I imported it?
  • what happens if the certificate has a pin? Does the browser ask for the pin every time it is launched?
  • can I be sure that the certificate cannot be extracted from the token/smart card reader? Therefore, unless the token is stolen, can I be sure that the certificate cannot be cloned?
share|improve this question
    
Just to clarify: a certificate is a public key, possibly some additional attributes and the signature covering these data. So nothing is secret here and copies do no harm. The secret is the corresponding private key and security comes from applying the private key (typically depending on PIN entry) in a way to be verified using the public key from certificate. One of smart cards main purposes is to protect private key from unauthorized use, let alone extraction. –  guidot Jul 18 '13 at 6:45
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

by importing the certificate as a physical device, will the browser let me use the certificate as I imported it?

Yes. However you may recognize a higher delay when using a hardware token compared to a software token (e.g. for a smartcard 2-3 seconds).

what happens if the certificate has a pin? Does the browser ask for the pin every time it is launched?

by default e.g. Firefox only tries to access the client certificates if you connect to a web-page that has HTTPS client auth enabled. Then the PIN will be requested. Usually the PIN is then no longer needed as long as the token is not removed but that behavior may differ depending on the used PKCS#11 module (the software that connects Firefox with the token).

can I be sure that the certificate cannot be extracted frmo the token/smart card reader? Therefore, unless the token is stolen, can I be sure that the certificate cannot be cloned?

Then depends on the token. Some may have an API for extracting the private key but usually you can only use or delete private key + certificate from the token.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.