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I have a list of randomly generated numbers, which contains 1900 numbers, and im wanting to obtain a sorted list of the top 190 numbers. Ive written two versions of the partial sorting algorithm, 1st is a cpu version and 2nd is written so it can run on Cudafy.net, but there is a large difference in execution time between them, when run on the CPU, and i was wondering if someone could shed some light on why + is it possible to speed the 2nd version up further.

Note: the 2nd algorithm is going to be run on a gpu so i cant use linq or anything which wouldnt run on c as i will be using cudafy.net to run the code. Unfortunately cudafy.net also doesnt support jagged arrays.

Version 1:

    /// <summary>
    /// Sequentially runs through all the values in the array and identifies if 
    /// the current number is less than the highest number in the sorted list.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="numbers"> Unsorted array of numbers.</param>
    /// <param name="sortedNumbers"> Array used to hold the partial list of sorted numbers.</param>
    public static void NewSorter(int[] numbers, int[] sortedNumbers)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < numbers.Length; i++)
        {
            if (sortedNumbers[sortedNumbers.Length - 1] > numbers[i])
            {
                //Update numbers
                IdentifyPosition(sortedNumbers, numbers[i]);
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Identifies the position the number should be placed in the partial list of sorted numbers.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sortedNumbers"> Array used to hold the partial list of sorted numbers.</param>
    /// <param name="NewNumber"> Number to be inserted.</param>
    static void IdentifyPosition(int[] sortedNumbers, int NewNumber)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < sortedNumbers.Length; i++)
        {
            if (NewNumber < sortedNumbers[i])
            {
                //Offset and add.
                ArrayShifter(sortedNumbers, i, NewNumber);
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Moves all the elements to the right of a point up one and 
    /// then places the new number in the specified point.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="SortedNumbers"> Array used to hold the partial list of sorted numbers.</param>
    /// <param name="position"> Position in the array where the new number should be place.</param>
    /// <param name="NewNumber"> Number to include in the array.</param>
    static void ArrayShifter(int[] SortedNumbers, int position, int NewNumber)
    {
        for (int i = SortedNumbers.Length - 1; i > position; i--)
        {
            SortedNumbers[i] = SortedNumbers[i - 1];
        }

        SortedNumbers[position] = NewNumber;
    }

The above version executed in ~ 0.65 milliseconds

Version 2:

    /// <summary>
    /// Sequentially runs through all the values in the array and identifies if 
    /// the current number is less than the highest number in the sorted list.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="unsortedNumbers"> Unsorted numbers.</param>
    /// <param name="lookbackCount"> Length of the array.</param>
    /// <param name="sortedNumbers"> Array which will contain the partial list of sorted numbers.</param>
    [Cudafy]
    public static void CudaSorter(GThread thread, long[,] unsortedNumbers, int[] lookbackCount, long[,] sortedNumbers)
    {
        int threadIndex = thread.threadIdx.x;
        int blockIndex = thread.blockIdx.x;
        int threadsPerBlock = thread.blockDim.x;
        int gpuThread = (threadIndex + (blockIndex * threadsPerBlock));

        if (gpuThread < 32)
        {
            int maxIndex = (lookbackCount[gpuThread] * 10) / 100;
            int maxLookback = lookbackCount[gpuThread];

            for (int i = 0; i < maxLookback; i++)
            {
                if (sortedNumbers[gpuThread, maxIndex] > unsortedNumbers[gpuThread, i])
                {
                    //Update numbers
                    IdentifyPosition2(sortedNumbers, unsortedNumbers[gpuThread, i], maxIndex, gpuThread);
                }
            }
        }
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Identifies the position in the sortedNumbers array where the new number should be placed.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sortedNumbers"> Sorted numbers.</param>
    /// <param name="newNumber"> Number to be included in the sorted array.</param>
    /// <param name="maxIndex"> length of sortedNumbers array. </param>
    /// <param name="gpuThread"> GPU thread index.</param>
    [Cudafy(eCudafyType.Device)]
    public static void CudaIdentifyPosition(long[,] sortedNumbers, long newNumber, int maxIndex, int gpuThread)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < maxIndex; i++)
        {
            if (newNumber < sortedNumbers[gpuThread, i])
            {
                //Offset and add.
                ArrayShifter2(sortedNumbers, i, newNumber, maxIndex, gpuThread);
                break;
            }
        }
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Shifts all the elements to the right of the specified position, 1 position
    /// to the right, and insert the new number in the specified position.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="sortedNumbers"> Sorted Numbers.</param>
    /// <param name="position"> Where the new number needs to be inserted.</param>
    /// <param name="newNumber"> New number to insert.</param>
    /// <param name="maxIndex"> Length of sortedNumbers array.</param>
    /// <param name="gpuThread"> GPU thread index.</param>
    [Cudafy(eCudafyType.Device)]
    public static void CudaArrayShifter(long[,] sortedNumbers, int position, long newNumber, int maxIndex, int gpuThread)
    {
        for (int i = maxIndex - 1; i > position; i--)
        {
            sortedNumbers[gpuThread, i] = sortedNumbers[gpuThread, i - 1];
        }

        sortedNumbers[gpuThread, position] = newNumber;
    }

The above executes in 2.8 milliseconds ie ~ 4x slower.

Ive already tried the following:

  1. Declared local variable for maxLookBack count and used that in the for loop => no improvement.
  2. Changed data types from long[,] to int[,] => 2.6 milliseconds (This isnt feasible as i need to use long.)
  3. Changed int[,] to int[] => 1.3 milliseconds (This isnt feasible either as i need to pass multiple arrays to the GPU to keep it occupied.) I was surprised how much this affected the time.

EDIT: I modified the code due to Henk's comments. I now ran the gpu version on the gpu with unsortedNumbers[32,1900] vs a single thread on the cpu sorting 1 array. Even when i multiply the cpu time by 32, its still considerably lower than the gpu's time.

share|improve this question
1  
when run on the CPU - that makes this benchmark pointless. There is no reason that a slow version on the CPU couldn't be the fastest on the GPU. And vice versa. –  Henk Holterman Jul 17 '13 at 11:36
    
@HenkHolterman ive run it on the GPU as well with 32 thread, ie 1 thread block, and i got just over 1 second though it was with different data. –  Hans Rudel Jul 17 '13 at 11:46
    
@HenkHolterman ive modified it so the cuda version ran on the GPU. The "Partial Sort" time is still only for a single array but if multiplied by 32, its still lower than the cuda version. Thanks for ur help thus far. –  Hans Rudel Jul 17 '13 at 12:13

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