Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How does the following LINQ statement work?

Here is my code:

var list = new List<int>{1,2,4,5,6};
var even = list.Where(m => m%2 == 0);
list.Add(8);
foreach (var i in even)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i);
}

Output: 2, 4, 6, 8

Why not 2, 4, 6?

share|improve this question
98  
The result of a query expression is a query, not the execution of the query. –  Eric Lippert Jul 17 '13 at 14:41
6  
For less information see the accepted answer to this question. –  Daniel Jul 17 '13 at 14:45
9  
Surely you can think of a title which actually summarizes the question. –  Matt Ball Jul 17 '13 at 16:51
2  
My guess about the downvotes (6 by now, not mine) is that they consider the question title too generic to be a good question. But, seeing the number of upvotes, and becoming the top question of the week in the newsletter, I don't think you need to worry about it too much. –  Abel Jul 23 '13 at 17:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 227 down vote accepted

The output is 2,4,6,8 because of deferred execution.

The query is actually executed when the query variable is iterated over, not when the query variable is created. This is called deferred execution.

-- Suprotim Agarwal, "Deferred vs Immediate Query Execution in LINQ"

There is another execution called Immediate Query Execution, which is useful for caching query results. From Suprotim Agarwal again:

To force immediate execution of a query that does not produce a singleton value, you can call the ToList(), ToDictionary(), ToArray(), Count(), Average() or Max() method on a query or query variable. These are called conversion operators which allow you to make a copy/snapshot of the result and access is as many times you want, without the need to re-execute the query.

If you want the output to be 2,4,6, use .ToList():

var list = new List<int>{1,2,4,5,6};
var even = list.Where(m => m%2 == 0).ToList();
list.Add(8);
foreach (var i in even)
{
    Console.WriteLine(i);
}
share|improve this answer
8  
Count(), Max(), Avg(), Sum() and probably other methods that need to take the whole list into consideration, also cause evaluation of the query. –  Kenned Jul 17 '13 at 14:35
1  
I've often thought about having, say, 'filteredList' as a variable, rather than 'filterList()' as a method - the idea being, you iterate over it each time you want the list filtered, rather than calling a method. Might be an interesting, if unusual and perhaps imperfect performance-wise, method of doing things. –  Katana314 Jul 17 '13 at 14:41
4  
@Sebastian - Further to @Kenned's comment, .First(), .FirstOrDefault(), .Single() and .SingleOrDefault() also trigger the evaluation of the query. –  Scotty.NET Jul 17 '13 at 15:46
4  
astonishing how you got the answer in less than 30sec :D –  M.C. Jul 17 '13 at 21:30
2  
@M.C I don't know why you are asking this question. Whole answer was not given at a time. It was edited several times. –  Atish Dipongkor Jul 18 '13 at 2:50

This has happened because of deferred execution, which means that the calculation of the expression is not executed until it is needed someplace. This makes the performance better if the data is too large.

share|improve this answer
3  
You might nuance that, as it can also mean that your expensive enumeration is being executed multiple times. In such a case you might even suffer performance loss. –  Grimace of Despair Jul 18 '13 at 10:48

The reason for this is the deferred execution of your lambda expression. The query gets executed when you start iterating in the foreach loop.

share|improve this answer
11  
Technically it's the deferred execution of the iterator, not the lambda. –  D Stanley Jul 17 '13 at 20:06

When you use an IEnumerable<> obtained from LINQ, only is created an Enumerator class and the iteration only start when you use it in some walk.

share|improve this answer

You are getting this result because of deferred execution which means result is actually not evaluated until its first accessed.

To make it more clear just add 10 to the list at end of your snipet and then print again you will not get 10 in output

     var list = new List<int>{1,2,4,5,6};
    var even = list.Where(m => m%2 == 0).Tolist();
    list.Add(8);
    foreach (var i in even)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(i);
    }
//new*
    list.Add(10);
    foreach (var i in even)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(i);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Did you actually try that? I get 10 in the output. –  Mark Hurd Jul 25 '13 at 6:44
    
good catch @MarkHurd yes didn't added .ToList(). edited the post now it should give expected output. My expectation was expression is evaluated only when you use the var for first time but it looks like it is getting evaluated everytime –  sandeep Jul 31 '13 at 8:17
    
Now it won't contain 8 in either output. –  Mark Hurd Jul 31 '13 at 11:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.