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C# ASP .NET MVC 4.0

I understand the MVC pattern, but when it comes down to the model:

public class User
{
    int id { get; set }
    int name { get; set; }
}

I could see a benefit to dividing the business logic from the repository ( data fetchers ). Something like:

public class UserRepository
{
    IEnumerableList<User> GetAllUsers()
    {
        IEnumerableList<Product> users = //LINQ or entity;
        return IEnumerableList<Product> users;  
    }  

    int GetScoreByUserId( id )          
    {
        int score = //LINQ or entity;
        return score;  
    }  
}

Would the business logic go into the User class like:

public class User
{
    public int id { get; set }
    public int name { get; set; }

    public bool HasDiscount( int id )
    {
        if( GetScoreByUserId( id ) > 5 )
            return true;
        return false;
    }
}

Does anyone have a decent example. It's not as easy as 1 2 3 to find such an explicit example for me.

Does the above code seem okay? Should the Repository extend the User or should it be a separate class.. or should all of this stuff just go in the User class itself?

EDIT::---- So something like this?

public class UserBusinessLogic
{
    public bool HasDiscount( int id )
    {
        if( GetScoreByUserId( id ) > 5 )
            return true;
    }
}

EDIT::---- Clarification of how I understand this now

enter image description here

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2  
Strictly speaking, that is not related to the "MVC" pattern. It falls into the more general separation of concern / business rules. But your UserRepository should definitely not inherit User. –  Simon Belanger Jul 17 '13 at 12:41
    
If that is so, and I separated it out.. would it then be good separation? (so see my edit) –  Jimmyt1988 Jul 17 '13 at 12:44
    
The repository should handle data access. Business logic could be put into a business logic layer/services layer. So the business layer calls the repository to get the entity, does what it needs to do and returns whatever is needed to your controller. –  Matty M Jul 17 '13 at 12:46
    
Can you refer to my last edit? Is this quite a typical layout of it? –  Jimmyt1988 Jul 17 '13 at 12:56
    
@JamesT - actually, what ASP.NET MVC refers to as "viewmodel" is presentation model concept (though, I prefer calling it "presentation object", because Fowler propensity to slap "model" on everything is F___ING CONFUSING). This means that your "viewmodel bubble" should be inside the view. –  tereško Aug 1 '13 at 18:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are a few options in your situation. They are described in, for example, such book as "Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture" by Martin Fowler. So it depends on the architecture pattern that you are going to choose.

When you were trying to find a solution you actually make smth like domain model pattern (User class for related business logic and separate UserRepository class for data access).

You can also merge these responsibilities in one class User (both business logic and data access) and so you will come to Active Record pattern.

However each pattern has its own pros and cons, I think that it definitely would be better to use domain model as it leads to OOP and right separation of concerns.

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Ah so you're saying there are different types... So the version I am representing is called domain model. I went on a .NET MVC course and domain model approach seems to be ringing a bell for me. If I am right, the advantage of having this separation means that you have a precise representation (View model) of what will be displayed in the view! Makes utter sense to me now if this is right. I mean, why would you want to have access to repository methods from the view? Answer is, you DONT! –  Jimmyt1988 Jul 17 '13 at 15:00
    
+1 Great book and good advice. –  SpiritMachine Jul 18 '13 at 11:16

I've had great success following this pattern: FooController -> FooTasks -> FooRepository.

It was shown to me by this smart guy.

"The controller gives the model to FooTasks, which in turn translates the model into a business object that goes to the FooRepository. The upside there is that any sort of lower-level representation of the data is nicely hidden from the controller. The controller shouldn't need to know how the data looks when it's getting persisted."

It helped me immensely with my MVC-applications.

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