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hi every body i have problem with this question

Duplicate Elimination Use a one-dimensional array to solve the following problem: Write an application that inputs 10 integers. As each number is read, display it only if it is not a duplicate of a number already read. Use the smallest possible array to solve this problem. Display the complete set of unique values input after the user inputs all values.

Sample Output:

Enter 10 integers:

12 33 67 9 10 6 6 34 10 19

Unique Values:

12 33 67 9 10 6 34 19 note the question ask to reprint the array but without any repeating number

and this is my code

import java.util.Scanner;

public class duplicate 
{

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    int[] array = new int[10];
    int[] barray = new int[10];

    System.out.println(" Enter 10 integers: ");
    int i ;
    for(i=0;i<array.length;i++)
    {
        array[i]= input.nextInt();
        barray[i] = array[i];
    }
    for(i=0;i<array.length;i++)
    {
        System.out.printf("\t %d ",array[i]);

    }
    System.out.println("\n Unique values are: ");


        for ( i = 0; i < array.length; i++ )
        {


            {
                if ( array[ i ] == barray[ i ] )
                    break;
                  System.out.printf("\t %d",array[i]);

            }


        }

    }

}

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1  
And your problem would be? –  lc. Nov 20 '09 at 12:05
    
I think that the problem is that the "print duplicates" part does not work –  Konamiman Nov 20 '09 at 12:10
    
Please see this link where is a similar question: javalobby.org/java/forums/t18768.html –  Michał Ziober Nov 20 '09 at 12:11

9 Answers 9

Do you really need to use arrays? A Set would be ideal here:

public static void main(String[] args) {
	Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
	Set<Integer> set = new HashSet<Integer>(10);

	System.out.println(" Enter 10 integers: ");

	for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
		set.add(input.nextInt());
	}
	System.out.println("Unique values are: ");

	for (Integer i : set) {
		System.out.printf("\t %d", i);
	}
}
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12  
Giving a complete solution does not help his learning. –  rsp Nov 20 '09 at 12:28
1  
The assignment requires the use of a one-dimensional array. –  Kelly S. French Nov 20 '09 at 17:29
    
Using a LinkedHashSet will also preserve order. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 20 '09 at 22:47

Assuming that your problem is that the "print duplicates" part does not work: can you use a Vector? If so, you could do something like this when printing the unique values:

for each item in the array
   if the vector does not contain the item
      print the value
      insert the item in the vector
share|improve this answer
    
Indeed. Anyway I guess that at this point the author should clarify its question a little. –  Konamiman Nov 20 '09 at 12:12
    
If he could use Vector, then why not a Set? That's even easier. - On second thought, Set changes the sequence of the values, it's either undefined (HashSet) or ordered (TreeSet). So List<Integer> is better :) –  Andreas_D Nov 20 '09 at 12:14
1  
@Andreas_D you sir need to learn about LinkedHashSet –  ILMTitan Nov 20 '09 at 18:44
    
Or, more generally, the SortedSet interface. –  bcat Nov 20 '09 at 22:55

Have you considered your problem without focusing on code? Imagine I gave you a bit of paper and asked you to write down all the numbers I shouted out, without duplicates, then read the numbers back to me when I was done. Think how you'd solve that in the real world before writing the code. E.g. would you write down numbers twice then score them out later? Would you need 2 sheets of paper - one with duplicates and one without?

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For your last loop, I'd consider something like this:

for(int i = 0; i < array.length; i++)
{
    Boolean duplicated = false;
    for(int j = 0; j<i; j++) {
       if(array[i] == array[j]) {
         //number already printed
         duplicated = true; 
         break;
       }
    }
    if(duplicated == false) //print number here.
}

It's not the best way to do it, but It follows what you already did.
The best way would be to use an adequate structure, I'm not a Java user but maybe HashSet is the way to go.

share|improve this answer
    
yes i must use array the problem is 1- print tthe orginal array 2- print the array with no repeating number –  tootaa Nov 20 '09 at 12:42
    
Is the solution, I provided, working for you ? I'm using an array, the HashSet was just a suggestion anyway. –  Soufiane Hassou Nov 20 '09 at 13:06

What do you think about:

Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
int[] array = new int[10];
System.out.println("Enter 10 integers:");
for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++)
 array[i] = input.nextInt();
for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++)
 System.out.print(array[i] + ", ");
System.out.println();
System.out.println("Unique values are: ");
for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
 boolean show = true;
 for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
  if (array[j] == array[i]) {
   show = false;
   break;
  }
 if (show)
  System.out.print(array[i] + ", ");
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you its really work but is their another way without using boolean OR Not –  tootaa Nov 20 '09 at 15:24
    
If You can use only one-dimensional array - no possible to solve this problem without boolean values. You need to check whether the value has already been displayed. Set - is the best collection to solve this problem ;) –  Michał Ziober Nov 21 '09 at 1:03

The Arrays class http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Arrays.html have some useful methods for this topic, like sort.

  1. Sort array
  2. copy first integer to a new output array
  3. Loop over all integers
  4. if previous integer differs from current
  5. create new array with output array size + 1 and copy all values finally add last value

Skipping input, the loop could look like:

    int[] out = new int[1]; 	
	int[] ints = new int[]{3,56,2,98,76,4,9,2,3,55};
	Arrays.sort(ints);
	out[0] = ints[0]; 									//handle first value
	for(int i = 1; i < ints.length; i++){			
		if(ints[i-1] != ints[i]){				
			int[] temp = new int[out.length+1];
			for(int j = 0; j < temp.length-1; j++){
				temp[j] = out[j];						//copy all previous
			}				
			temp[temp.length - 1] = ints[i];			//add last value
			out = temp;
		}
	}
	System.out.println(Arrays.toString(out));
share|improve this answer

How about using a BitSet since all the values are integers.

BitSet bs = new BitSet();

for(int i=0; i<array.lenght; i++)
{
    bs.set(array[i]);    
}

System.out.println("Unique Values are: "+bs.toString());
share|improve this answer

Two things to change:

  1. Use only a single array
  2. Filter duplicates on input, not output.

If you loop over your array for each input looking for dups. Dup? then don't insert, not dup? add to the array.

Using the smallest array possible is a trick because it depends on knowing how many dups will be input ahead of time which you may not. There are two solutions, use an array that is only big enough for the unique numbers in the assignment, or when you exceed the size of the array, create a new one and copy all the values over to it. Does the assignment mean you are limited to using one one instance of an array which happens to be single-dimensional or only that the array you use must be one-dimensional but you can use more than one array?

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You can also try a shorter, if more obscure...

System.out.println("Unique values "+
    new LinkedHashSet<String>(Arrays.asList(scanner.nextLine().split(" +"))));
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