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Is there a pattern to run a block of code inside an infinite loop only once? Of course this is easy with a flag outside of the loop. But I I'm interested in an approach which only takes place in a loop.

This example needs an external variable which is not what I want.

bool flag = true;
while(true)
{
    if(someCondition() && flag)
    {
        // code that runs only once
        // ...

        flag = false;
    }        

    // code that runs every time
    // ...
}

Is there a way to get rid of the external flag? For example using lambdas? If this isn't possible, could one write one external manager to handle many code blocks without defining a flag for them manually?

By the way, I use the Visual Studio 11 compiler so I can make use of some C++11 features.

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5  
Why not move that code out of the loop? –  sharptooth Jul 17 '13 at 13:36
    
I don't see the problem with using a flag truthfully. If I didn't want to do that, I'd just move it elsewhere. –  Rapptz Jul 17 '13 at 13:38
    
Assuming the "move out of the loop" isn't what you are looking for, how do you know what should be executed only once, and "when"? –  Mats Petersson Jul 17 '13 at 13:38
    
@sharptooth The loop is an application loop, so it runs all the time. Making use of asynchronous threads would be too much for this. –  danijar Jul 17 '13 at 13:38
1  
@MatsPetersson I want to execute given blocks of code only once, when the block is reached the first time. This may be the first iteration of the loop but due to other conditionals it may be later, too. –  danijar Jul 17 '13 at 13:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

a possibly cleaner way to write this, albeit still with a variable, would be as follows

while(true){
   static uint64_t c;
   // some code that executes every time
   if(c++ == 0){
      // some code that executes only once
   }
   // some more code that executes every time.
 }

The static allows you to declare the variable inside the loop, which IMHO looks cleaner. If your code that executes every time makes some testable change, you could get rid of the variable and write it like this:

while(true){
   // some code that executes every time
   if(STATE_YOUR_LOOP_CHANGES == INITIAL_STATE){
      // some code that executes only once
   }
   // some more code that executes every time.
 }
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1  
Wouldn't c constantly increment until it exceeds the bounds of a short, then loop around and become 0 sometime again? –  Saviour Self Jul 17 '13 at 13:49
    
Got the idea. The comment above is right, incrementing c inside the following code block is more clever. Moreover, a boolean flag would do the trick, too. –  danijar Jul 17 '13 at 13:53
    
yes I included the counter variable because it is potentially more useful in a general case. –  Mobius Jul 17 '13 at 13:56
    
@Mobius I think it's not since the only once code block is not likely to be reached every iteration. So the counter variable wouldn't represent the loop count. –  danijar Jul 17 '13 at 13:59
    
@danijar I was thinking the if statement should be executed every iteration, so c should be incremented every iteration. Do I have something wrong? –  Mobius Jul 17 '13 at 14:04

It's fairly hacky, but as you said it's the application main loop, I assume it's in a called-once function, so the following should work:

struct RunOnce {
  template <typename T>
  RunOnce(T &&f) { f(); }
};

:::

while(true)
{
  :::

  static RunOnce a([]() { your_code });

  :::

  static RunOnce b([]() { more_once_only_code });

  :::
}
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This is kind of what I am looking for. Could we destroy the instance in the constructor after executing the lambda? –  danijar Jul 17 '13 at 14:00
1  
@danijar No, it has static storage duration, so it will be destructed at program shutdown. The question is why you'd need to do that. Note that the lambda is not stored in the struct, just executed and forgotten (i.e. it gets destructed). The struct instance itself will probably just occupy 1-4 bytes depending on your compiler without doing anythin with them. –  Angew Jul 17 '13 at 14:05
    
Okay, it just wouldn't have felt so hacky. –  danijar Jul 17 '13 at 14:07

For a less convoluted version of Mobius's answer:

while(true)
  // some code that executes every time
  for(static bool first = true;first;first=false)
  {
    // some code that executes only once
  }
  // some more code that executes every time.
}

You could also write this using ++ on a bool, but that's apparently deprecated .

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If you know you only want to run this loop once, why not use break as the last statement in the loop.

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1    while(true)
2    {
3        if(someCondition())
4        {
5            // code that runs only once
6            // ...
7          // Should change the value so that this condition must return false from next execution.
8        }        
9    
10        // code that runs every time
11        // ...
12    }

If you expecting the code without any external flag then you need to change the value of condition in last statement of the condition. (7th line in code snippet)

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Please read the comments under the question. For example if the player level exceeds a given number, he should get an award once. I can't lower the player level just to not hand in the award twice. while(1){ if(level > 7){ once([=]{ award(); }); } } –  danijar Jul 18 '13 at 9:54
    
Please read again the comments under the question because the first question is that without using the flag how to implement then only he is thinking about the next options. –  Meg Jul 18 '13 at 10:04
    
What does it matter weather the flag is a boolean variable right before the while loop or another flag inside the condition function? –  danijar Jul 18 '13 at 10:16
    
Here I'm not mentioned about the flag because I don't want to create any new variable or flag (Re-usability concept). By using the condition value we can manipulate the same. Just verify my code. –  Meg Jul 18 '13 at 10:33

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