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I was experimenting with c++, trying to understand inheritance and wrote the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

class Base1{
public:
    virtual void print_hello() const
    { std::cout << "Base1: Hello!" << std::endl;}
};

class Base2{
public:
    virtual void print_hello() const
    { std::cout << "Base2: Hello!" << std::endl; }
};

class Derived: public Base1, public Base2
{
public:  
    virtual void print_hello() const
    { std::cout << "Derived: Hello!" << std::endl; }
};

int main() {    
Base1* pb1=new Derived;

pb1->print_hello();

delete pb1;

Base2* pb2=new Derived;

pb2->print_hello();

delete pb2;

return EXIT_SUCCESS;}

The code compiled ok but when I ran it, I got a run time error:

Derived: Hello!
Derived: Hello!
*** glibc detected *** ./a.out: free(): invalid pointer: 0x0000000001b0c018 ***

followed by a Back trace and a memory map list

Both cout statements were printed in the screen so I guess the error originates when trying to delete pb2.

If I do not specify the member functions virtual, the code runs ok. The code also runs ok if I reuse pb1 after I delete it (i.e. pb1=new Derived;), instead of creating the new pointer pb2. What am I missing here?

PS: I tried the code in Ubuntu 12.04 using both g++ (4.6.4) and icc (2013.3.163)

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Perhaps you could add a destructor on all classes, with some cout statements in it, to see what's going on when deleting the pointer. –  Frederik Gheysels Jul 17 '13 at 13:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are entering in to the wonderful world of Undefined Behavior, in two places:

delete pb1;
delete pb2;

This is Undefined Behavior because niether Base1 nor Base2 have virtual destructors, but you are trying to delete the objects pointed to through a base pointer.

It might suprise you that the first instance (delete pb1) is also Undefined Behavior, because it appears to work. That's the beauty of Undefined Behavior -- anything can happen, even what you were expecting to happen.

As a rule, when using polymorphism your base classes should always have a virtualdestructor. In many cases, it can be trivial:

class Base1{
public:
    virtual void print_hello() const
    { std::cout << "Base1: Hello!" << std::endl;}
      virtual ~Base1() {}
};

class Base2{
public:
    virtual void print_hello() const
    { std::cout << "Base2: Hello!" << std::endl; }
      virtual ~Base2() {};
};

I'll also point out that your hierarchy is somewhat... unusual. Generally multiple inheritence is not needed. There are usually better ways to accomplish what you're trying to do. When you do use multiple inheritence, it's almost always a design flaw to have multiple base classes that have member functions with the same name. You are generally going to get unexpected (but well-defined) behavior.

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When you delete an object of a derived type through a pointer to the base type, the base type must have a virtual destructor. Without it you have undefined behavior. So: add a virtual destructor to Base1 and to Base2.

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Thank you guys! It is all clear to me now. –  thanasis Jul 17 '13 at 13:55

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