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I'm writing several functions that are effectively deferred objects that depend on varying combinations of other deferred objects.

function takesOneSecond() {
    return $.Deferred(function(deferred) {
        // Does something...
    }).promise();
}

function takesOneMinute() {
    return $.Deferred(function(deferred) {
        // Does something...
    }).promise();
}

function takesThreeMinutes() {
    return $.Deferred(function(deferred) {
        // Does something...
    }).promise();
}

function mySwitchingFunction() {

    return $.Deferred(function(deferred) {

        // Does something here..
        // Effectively chooses one of several other functions to call.

        if(/* choose 1 second */) {

            // We tie ourselves to the '1 second' function.

            // Call that function.
            takesOneSecond().done(function() {

                deferred.resolve(); // If that's done, I'm done too.

            }).fail(function() {

                deferred.reject(); // If that failed, I've failed too.

            });

        } else if(/* choose 1 minute */) {

            // Etc..

        } else if(/* choose 3 minutes */) {

            // Etc..

        }

    }).promise();

}

I'm writing this snippet of code a lot, is there no other way to make a deferred mirror or cascade the same 'resolved' or 'rejected' state of another deferred?

takesOneSecond().done(function() {
    deferred.resolve(); // If that's done, I'm done too.
}).fail(function() {
    deferred.reject(); // If that failed, I've failed too.
});
share|improve this question
    
Is using $.when to combine deferred objects what you are looking for? – BNL Jul 17 '13 at 14:29
    
If your writing that pattern a lot, I'd say you're doing something seriously wrong and should rethink your logic. – adeneo Jul 17 '13 at 14:30
    
@adeneo: Are you able to point at something specific? It's basically at the end of a series of sanity-checks. At the end of the checks, one of several functions (each a deferred) will be called depending on the results of the checks. Do you have a particular pattern to recommend? – Ben Jenkinson Jul 17 '13 at 14:39
    
I'm guessing all these checks are asynchronous then, otherwise what's the point of using a sh1tl0ad of promises ? – adeneo Jul 17 '13 at 14:43
    
@BNL I don't really need to provide them. In this case, my 'second' deferred object only consists of the 'first' deferred object. It has no duration of its own. However, that might not have been the case depending on the results of the other logic. – Ben Jenkinson Jul 17 '13 at 14:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you don't need to construct a new promise at all. Just return the first promise.

function mySecondFunction() {
    // Does something here..
    // Effectively chooses one of several other functions to call.
    // In this case, assume I've just chosen the 'myFirstFunction' function.

    // Call that function and return its promise
    return myFirstFunction();
}

If you want to emphasize the "at the same time" part but maybe resolve with a different value, you could just create a new one by chaining with .then:

function mySecondFunction() {
    return myFirstFunction().then(function(resultOfFirst) {
        // but ignore it and
        return differentResult;
    }); // errors will propagate automatically
}
share|improve this answer
    
D'oh. I think you're right. That's quite obvious now I think about it that way. This doesn't help me for all of the situations that I'm intending to use this, but it would certainly work for the simpler scenarios. Thank you. – Ben Jenkinson Jul 17 '13 at 14:54

I think you may not understand promises. Using the .then method of a promise ( pipe in jQuery < 1.8 ), you can return a new promise and so on. That's how you build up a promise chain.

Here's an example of something that's similar to what you're trying to do:

function returnOne() {
  return $.Deferred(function( dfr ) {
     dfr.resolve( 1 );
  }).promise();
}

// Number will be the result of the original Deferred/Promise
function addTwo( num ) {
    return $.Deferred(function( dfr ) {
        dfr.resolve( num + 2 );
    }).promise();
}

returnOne().then( addTwo ).then(function( result ) {
    // Will be 3
    console.log( result );
});

Using that logic, you can filter the resolution or rejections of your promises however you want, including just re-resolving or rejecting with the same value, but maybe doing some intermediate work

share|improve this answer

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